Struggle City: the Best and the Worst of the Finals Wall

Finals WallEvery semester, it’s the same trip to Struggle City for us Hoyas. Whether you’re writing a 20-page paper, studying for Orgo or just avoiding all of life on Lau 2, finals week at Georgetown gets really real really fast. Really. The Finals Wall, located in The Midnight MUG on Lau 2, serves as a record of all the pain and strife Georgetown students have faced – and continue to face – during this strenuous week. After examining the Finals Wall, I’ve come to the conclusion that some of us clearly struggle better than others. Here are the best and worst struggles of the Finals Wall:

The Best

This guy who made the best of a bad situation:2013-12-16-20.26.00

This post with questionable grammar neatly summarizing the struggle.

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Wow.

This person who remembered why we put ourselves through the stress:

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I can see my success in her self-titled visual album.

This person who we’re a bit concerned about. The detox that is winter break is closer than you think, anonymous orange-crayon-user!

Fear of missing out #FOMO
Fear of missing out #FOMO

The Worst

This person who is in a really tight spot.

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Good luck, bro.

This person who shares in one other struggle many of us Lau-goers have faced.

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CAPUCCINOMORE.

This person who eloquently described all of our feelings towards econ.

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AMEN!

And, finally, amidst all the struggle, the unifying theme.

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Everyday I’m strugglin’.

Whatever your strife, the 4E believes in you! Own that essay, ace that test. Remember: After enduring all these struggles you can’t possibly fail!

Photo: Matt Sullivan for The Hoya, Zelchandlerpresents.wordpress.com

In a Word: Midterms

in a word

At Georgetown, there is truly no midterm “season”.  Midterms seem to stretch from the first week of October until almost Thanksgiving, which can be bewildering and frustrating.  I figured now is as good of a time as any, right in the heart of mid-term season, to find out what Georgetown students really think about mid-terms.

I asked, and you delivered.  In the form of one word responses, here are Hoyas’ true feelings about Georgetown’s midterm season.

The Overwhelmed

The most common word sent in by everyone was “stressful” (or, in two cases, “stress”).  Next most popular? “Death”.  These are the “I have two midterms in all five classes between October and November” people … or anyone in Orgo.  Sorry guys.

The Challenged

Not surprisingly, “hard” came up a lot.  That was the first word that came to my mind.  Midterms are, plain and simple, challenging. Of course, the point of going to a high-level university is to be challenged, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get a little upset over the extra struggle.

The Un-phased

I like to pretend to be this person, but generally anyone who claims to be un-phased by midterms is lying.  Or a jerk.  I’m actually really happy for the people that were able to answer “fine,” “fun,” “overrated” and even “enlightening”.  Just slightly bitter.

The Miserable

These are the people who spend more hours in a week on Lau 5 than they do in their bed.  Generally, it is more of a “short burst” of work for these students, but the description “hell” was one of our top submissions, and “struggle” and “strugglebus” both made it up quite a few times.

The Tired

I mean, this is basically everyone at this point.  You get through three midterms in one week, and celebrate.  Then you check your upcoming assignments and proceed to a) cry, b) curl up into a ball, c) yell, or d) do all of the above.  “Tiring”, “Never-ending”, “endless”, “perpetual” and “tolling” all were submitted multiple times.  I mean, they will end eventually.  It might just be 20 degrees colder by the time they do.

Hang in there Hoyas; you can do it! It does get better! Now, if you excuse me, I have some studying to go do.

All Aboard the Struggle Bus: Georgetown Problems

THE STRUG

Co-authored by Max Wheeler and Lindsay Lee

The term “First World Problems” has become well-ingrained into the language and culture of college students and social media users everywhere, referring to complaints about good/great things in someone’s life that just aren’t quite good enough.  I’ll be honest that I’m guilty of these “First World Problem” rants at times.

Georgetown students struggle with some of these problems every day– and that’s not supposed to be insulting, simply an admission of what is to come.  Here are some unique Georgetown Problems that only Hoyas can truly understand.

Leo’s Doors

Everyone has inevitably embarrassed themselves attempting to enter or exit Leo’s with a crowd of people behind them.  I don’t care how much you work out at Yates, those doors are unnaturally heavy.  Maybe it’s a way to burn some calories before and after meals.

Silverware Shortages

Sticking with the Leo’s theme, anyone who has made the mistake of going to dinner during rush hour has also run into a surprising shortage of silverware.  Forks are typically the first thing to go, followed quickly by spoons, which is unfortunate because typically it’s hard to eat things with knives (without hurting yourself).  Hopefully you can find some finger food.

Lau Doors

Going along with the door complaint above, the doors to the Lau staircases are also unnaturally heavy. I know I can’t be the only one who has left Lau 2 with a bagel in one hand and a coffee in the other and can’t make it back to the fourth floor without some assistance from a kind stranger. They’re also too heavy for you to do the push-a-little-harder-to-swing-the-door-open-as-you-leave-so-that-the-person-a-little-ways-behind-you-can-catch-it-so-you-don’t-have-to-stand-there-and-hold-it-but-wont-be-rude maneuver we all know so well.

The Leavey Elevators

Only a select number of Hoyas have experienced the Leavey elevators: those who frequent the esplanade, anyone who’s had an interview in the upstairs club room, and, of course, the staff of The Hoya on their way to Leavey 421. These elevators are absolutely terrifying and every time I get in, I wonder if I’ll ever come out alive.

The Walsh Elevators

Okay…maybe I should just start taking the stairs since I have so many qualms about the elevators. But the Walsh elevators seem to have reverse sensors, so that the doors close when they sense something between them and remain open for far too long, even when you’re pressing the “close door” button. They also move at a glacial pace so that you enter as a freshman, and emerge on the fourth floor as a senior…citizen.

The Hilltop

We live on a hill and it makes life hard sometimes. It is so tempting to leave Lau and to go downhill to eat at Leo’s, but after you’ve filled yourself with chili or chicken finger wok, you do NOT want to make the trip back uphill to study.

Our Mascot

“What does Hoya Saxa mean?”, “So…being the ‘Hoyas’ means you’re the ‘Whats’?”, “Does Hoya mean bulldog?”.

Building Entrances

Very few things confused me more when I first got to school than the fact that you don’t enter many buildings on the first floor.  Walk into Lau, and you are on the third floor already.  Walk into Regents or the MSB, and you could be on the first, second, or third floor. Same story for the ICC. I’m not an architect, but why does that make sense? WHY?!

Darnall

I’m going to start this last one with a disclaimer: I loved living in Darnall this year with about 95% of my heart. For any incoming freshmen, there is no reason to panic if you check your Housing at a Glance in August and see that you were placed in Darnall.  Lady Darnall will always have a special place in my heart.  But nothing epitomizes Georgetown Problems more than this residence hall. The elevators only “work” sometimes, I’m terrified to stay in the laundry room for more time than necessary, and the walk back from Leo’s with a full stomach is miserable so I spend a lot of money at Epicurean. It’s not really close to anything, for that matter. I have a hard time believing much has changed in that building since the 70’s or 80’s.  So while I couldn’t have asked for a better freshman dorm experience, you can’t fully appreciate Georgetown struggles until you’ve lived in that lovely building.

The struggles are real, Hoyas. Good luck.

Photo: Lindsay Lee/The Hoya

4E Flix: Pageantry and President-ry

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We are only a few weeks into the second semester, and you’ve begun to realize … “Oh, no. I’m already riding the Struggle Bus.” (The Struggle Bus, SB for short, is an imaginary place frequented by psycho-crazy-hard-working students, slackers and just about anyone who is hung over on Sunday morning.)
We at The Fourth Edition know what it’s like, trust us. We’ve seen you in Leo’s, and we would be judging you if we weren’t the very captains of the SB. You may be asking, how can I get off the SB? Hah. We’re still trying to figure that one out too. While we work on that, you should take some time to sit back, relax, and momentarily forget about your never-ending trip to Shambleyville.

Toddlers and Tiaras

t and tIf you want to feel better about yourself, you should definitely watch “The 1000 Pound Man,” but because you don’t necessarily have cable, try Netflix’s “Toddlers and Tiaras.” Start from the very beginning … I promise you will instantly feel better about your life. Guaranteed. Nothing says SB quite like a crazed, insecure, and attention-deprived pageant mom. It’s disgustingly addictive, and you’ll love yourself — and hate — yourself for it.

 

The West Wing

west wingIf you’re more of an intellectual, you can always catch up on all of those episodes you’ve been wanting to watch of  “The West Wing.” This Aaron Sorkin hit chronicles the life of Josiah Bartlett’s fictional term in the Oval Office. Political intrigue always distracts me from my mountain of gov reading, and I can’t imagine that I’m the only one. Can I get a witness, y’all? Where my gov majors at?? (Answer: everywhere. This is Georgetown after all)

 

 

Photo: YouTube, FanPop