Damn Molly: Back At It Again With The White Vans

Damn MollyIn the two and a half years since I got my license, I have hit cars on three separate occasions. To be fair, I was in reverse and paying zero attention at the time of each accident. Fortunately, all of these incidents occurred in my driveway (sorry mom and dad) and left me with a pristine driving record. With these skills in my arsenal it only seemed appropriate that I take on a work study job as a van driver for the Center for Social Justice.

If you are a student like me with sub par driving skills and a passion for lip syncing behind the wheel, allow me to paint a picture of what a workday could be like for you. To become a certified driver of the monstrous twelve passenger van, I was required to take an online course that took me approximately forty five minutes. This consisted of all common sense questions and was completed while I simultaneously binge watched Entourage. Once you take the course, it’s time for you to dive right in. Myself and two other equally unqualified drivers were given the keys to a van and a map and set out on the open road.

Our goal was to drive the assigned route and return to Georgetown by 2 p.m. We had lofty ambitions to stop at Chick Fil A and listen to as much awful music as possible. Things were going swimmingly until the first driver hit an extremely narrow one way street. It turns out DC residents love double parking almost as much as they love politics! The driver took her chances turning down the road. That’s when I heard “Girl you gonn hit that, girl stop right now,” felt a jolt and participated in my first CSJ van accident! We called our coordinator who seemed to care less, filed a police report and wrote a casual note to slip under the windshield of the car we had hit. After a charmed interaction with the Metropolitan police, we put it in drive and went on our way.

By the time it was my turn to take the wheel, I felt no pressure at all. If I hit something now, I wouldn’t be doing anything the other driver hadn’t already done. I also couldn’t wait to tell my skeptical father that I wasn’t the first one to get into an accident. My portion of the drive went smoothly despite my directionally challenged nature and lack of technical skills.

Now, once a week, I get paid to drive tutors to various sites in Washington, DC. In between dropping them off and picking them up, I go to a local Wendy’s where I get a ton of strange looks by patrons wondering why that small caucasian female is driving a huge white van in their neighborhood. After I get my frosty, I sit in the front seat, blast Whitney Houston and sing at the top of my lungs. The moral of the story is that I get paid for all of this and you can too. Support social justice, apply to drive a CSJ whip today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gifs: giphy.com

The Five Times When You Know You Are A Senior

SENIORS

I am officially old. And, by old, I mean 20. But, I am a senior, which means I have three years of classes, parties and Wisey’s cookies to look back on.

Everyone always talks about how senior year is the best and so fun, but I think that someone has been lying to me. Don’t get me wrong, I always have a good time at Georgetown. But senior year, at least the fall, is beyond stressful. You’ve got classes, clubs, relationships (LOL or lack there of), internships, job recruitment and bills. Honestly, the list could go on and on.

So, in light of what I have experienced the last few weeks, here are the five times when you now you are a senior at Georgetown: 

1. You have explained Tuscany’s so many times that you are depressed. The youth has been deprived. I explained the saga of going to Tuscany’s yesterday and actually got emotional. Who doesn’t miss the curb sing-a-longs? Or, wait, was that just me?

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2. People expect you to know things. While I love all my new bloggers, who you will meet soon, they are definitely giving me too much credit. I say such nonsense. Words. Am I making up things? Most likely.

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I know less than Michael Scott.

3. You don’t know what Leo’s serves anymore. Literally I am looking for someone with a meal plan to take me to Leo’s for a #TBT. I miss it. I never thought I would say that. The kids these days keep mentioning these new stations and options, and I just shrug and disappear into the corner.

4. You would rather have a party with only your friends than spend the night at Rugby. Or Chimes. Or Brown House. Or SigEp (RIP Pink House). Why isn’t it socially acceptable to just sit around with my, like, 15 friends and gossip about people? I’ve met everyone at this school anyway!

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5. You cringe whenever you heard the G-word. And by that I mean graduation. Cringe. You can’t conceptualize how scary the real world is until you are sitting at your billionth information session at the career center thinking, “How the f*** did I get here?”

Thank god graduation isn’t for a few more months. I am not ready to be kicked out yet.

Photos/Gifs: gifsec.com; tumblr.com

D.C. Ranks Top City for Post-College Jobs

background-employmentGraduating from Georgetown – it’s something no one here wants to think about. The long, fun nights spent in Lau, the delicious food available at Leo’s, the top-notch living accommodations… who could ever want to leave everything that Georgetown has to offer? But eventually, you’ll have to leave your home on the Hilltop and enter the real world. However, whenever you are forcibly removed from campus, you’ll be greeted by a relatively large job market in the D.C. area.

According to Indeed and Apartment Guide’s newly released list of the top 10 cities with the most entry-level job openings, Washington, D.C. was named the top city for recent college graduates. This was determined by looking at the number of job postings available in major cities and combining that with the average rent and square footage for both one and two bedroom apartments in each city. (Obviously, they didn’t take Village B into consideration when they created this list.) With such a wide availability of jobs in the D.C. area, hopefully you’ll be able to avoid the always infuriating question of “So, what’s your plan once you graduate?”

While you may not find a stellar job that will put to use everything you learned in college (read: beer pong), you can rest assured you will at least be able to get a job in D.C. to pay the bills (i.e. your Georgetown debt).

Photo: amsmtg.com

How to Talk to a Second Semester Senior

Second Semester SeniorsAs they begin their last semester of college, the members of the Class of 2014 are in a strange place. Some of them have job offers and graduate school acceptances, but many of them do not. Whether they’re happy to graduate or wishing they had four more years, they should be handled delicately. Here are some tips from an expert (i.e., one of those stressed seniors) about what to say to these tender children.

Do not ask what they’re doing next year.

Most seniors do not have concrete plans yet. Even the few who do have law school acceptances, offers from consulting firms or Teach for America acceptances aren’t exempt from the self-doubt and anxiety that can come from contemplating the post-grad life. If you’ve somehow found a senior who doesn’t freak out when considering what lies beyond May 2014, at the very least they’re tired of talking about it.

Do not ask what it feels like to be a second semester senior.

It feels scary and exciting and weird and wonderful. Often at the same time. Do not use this as small talk unless you really want to know those things.

Do ask for advice.

Seniors are full of advice, and they’re also really self-absorbed, so they love giving it. They have wisdom about basically everything: classes, internships, relationships, extracurriculars and friendships.

But do not ask about the future of their relationships and friendships.

Your single friends have never felt more hopelessly single than they do right now, after winter break and a litany of aunts and uncles asking if they have a “special someone.” Those in relationships are all worried about whether they’ll last post-May 17. This also applies to all of their friendships, so don’t ask how much they’re going to miss their best friends. The answer? A lot.

Do accompany them to the Tombs.

Seniors love Tombs and as many of them begin 99 Days next month, they’re going to need some company. If you’re not 21, there’s always weekend brunch, lunch and dinner.

Do not judge them for the #SWUG life.

A SWUG is a senior wash-up girl. The SWUG life means going out without getting dressed up, staying in to drink wine and watch movies and napping at inappropriate times. We know your judgement is just envy.

Do be their cheerleader.

Whether they’re applying to grad programs, going to a job interview, starting a blog or finally showering, support them in their endeavors! A cheerful text or a hug might just make their day. For my fellow seniors, here’s a piece of advice from the latest episode of “Parks and Recreation” and my personal hero, Leslie Knope:

In times of stress or moments of transition, sometimes it can feel the whole world is closing in on you. When that happens you should close your eyes, take a deep breath, listen to the people who love you when they give you advice and remember what really matters.

Photo: Wikipedia

InternTips: A Balancing Act

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Some of you luckier ones out there might still be in that “cool summer job” phase this time around. You know what I mean: lifeguarding, babysitting, camp counseling, etc. — basically anything that’s not supposed to be preparing you for your future career path.

Up until last summer, I was in that boat myself with a cushy job at the local recreation department on the Jersey Shore (no, not that one) that involved a lot of playing sports with little kids and otherwise getting paid to sit around and do nothing. Now I’m taking a class while working a full-time unpaid internship. Go figure.

But that’s not at all to say that I’m looking at Summer 2013 as a wash. If you’re looking to sort out how to handle your commitments this summer while still having a good time, you’ve come to the right place. 4E is here with InternTips. A handy reoccurring post that will help you out with intern life.

Yes, you may no longer have the luxury of that beautifully cushy job where you got paid to tan or watch TV, but that doesn’t mean that it’s time to flip the switch and start working yourself to death. Even legitimate professionals take the summer easier than the rest of the year — people are noticeably less motivated to get work done in their depressing cubicle when it’s hot and sunny outside.

And newsflash: If you are going to be in D.C., it’s going to be extra hot and sunny for you. No one wants you to flood your internship office with your sweat, especially considering the fact that, in all likelihood, YOU’RE NOT EVEN GETTING PAID. So chill out.

That said, let’s not go crazy with the lazy. There’s certainly something to be said for getting a leg up, so constant slacking off just isn’t going to cut it once you’ve gotten to my unfortunate rising junior phase.

Internships are annoying and borderline enslavement, yes, but they also represent your only real chance to secure recommendations to show to future employers. It’s easy from a shortsighted perspective to see why the thought of getting fired from an unpaid internship might actually be kind of nice — you’d make the same amount partying or sitting playing Xbox as you would at that office at McPherson Square, after all.

You’re going to be asked what you did each summer, and you’ll be expected to provide concrete details. Make sure you’ve earned something tangible to say.

Perhaps you’re able to get by at your job by working only when the higher-ups are around, and you trick them into thinking you’re doing stuff. If so, then honestly, congrats, because you’ve managed to beat the system. But for the rest of us, presumably working with/for moderately intelligent people, then you’re going to have to put in the time and put in the effort. It might only be photocopying — which seems to be a great deal of what interns and even lower-level employees are doing nowadays — but it still counts. And it’s really not that difficult. Buck up, and do some work!

Okay, so at this point I’m not sure I can make my ultimate message here any more obvious. Summers can be big in terms of showcasing your legitimate, employable talents: “All right, you’re an A/B/C student. Now let’s see what you can actually do.

No one in our society anymore seems to be allowed to graduate without at least one internship, which means that those without them aren’t nearly as competitive. Taking classes to boost school-year grades or open up more time during the year (maybe for another internship) can make sense for some people too.

But don’t kill yourself over all of it.

In fact, if you’re the type of kid who feels the need to sacrifice all fun things just to work, then you’re likely also the type of kid who badly needs time off to relax and recharge.

When you get home from your internship or you finish up the day’s classes, allot some “me time” for yourself. Maybe that means throwing your work clothes on the floor, kicking your feet up to watch some TV or just getting away completely and enjoying the weather outside.

At the same time, don’t let yourself do nothing, either. You know the old adage: “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” And it will also make you jobless, unmarketable and lazy.

Could a summer of 24/7 work help you toward your goal of running the world one day? Sure. But you can’t sacrifice on treatin’ yourself at least every once in a while. You go to Georgetown; you’ve earned it.

Stay strong out there, Hoyas. And remember: balance.

Summer InternTips: Your First Week

If you’re like me, you just finished your third day of your summer internship. You’re learning the ropes at your new job, and you’re just starting to get to know your boss, secretary and office mates. But you’re still learning the ropes. You still have to check in at the front desk as a visitor because your badge hasn’t been made yet. You’re still eating lunch alone in your office. You arrive five minutes later than you’re supposed to because you missed your bus stop. (Note: these all apply to me. It’s OK.)

Because here at 4E we know that you’re probably in the same boat, we compiled some tips for how to make your first week as productive to your internship as possible:

1. Get to know your office. Explore all of the possibilities your company, building, and neighborhood have to offer. A lot of buildings (especially on Capitol Hill) have special perks to like food courts, cafes, ice cream or fro-yo, or fancy vending machines. Some offices have green roofs for lunch breaks so you don’t have to eat in your office.

2. Learn the ropes of your work. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. This is your first week — bosses expect questions, and always prefer them to incomplete or shoddy work. Now is the time to figure out how best to finish assignments so that you can do them consistently correctly for the rest of your internship.

3. Meet your coworkers, even the ones you won’t end up working with consistently. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to everyone. Basically, you don’t want to be the intern that no one knows the name of come July. Plus, think networking.

4. Start off on a good foot. Though you should expect to make some mistakes, be prompt, polite, and make an effort. Your bosses will expect mistakes as well, but they’ll be watching your work ethic and demeanor this week. Even if you make mistakes, making a good effort this week will help you secure more interesting and important projects later in your internship.

5. Save your money. Unpaid and paid interns alike, we all have thin wallets. So save your money by making your lunch ahead of time and bringing it to work, taking the bus ($1.50) instead of the Metro (with an upcoming price increase in July) or a cab.

6. Stay positive. Even if your week is rough (many of ours will be), the rest of the summer won’t be. Believe in yourself and your ability to learn how to do your job, meet other interns and network with your coworkers. The first week is tough for everybody. Almost certainly, next week will be better.

7. Link in with the greater D.C. intern community. D.C. in the summer is an exciting place with tons of other college students visiting us for the summer. Even though we here at Georgetown are blessed with a hefty set of connections in D.C., it is always a good idea to meet kids from other colleges at other internships. There are plenty of blogs, Twitter feeds and Facebook pages dedicated to summer interns here. Most are only relevant to those who don’t have the privilege of living in D.C. during the school year, but they’re still good resources for anyone on the Hilltop with an internship.

Image credit: Vanity Fair

You Should Really Branch Out

Still trying to find a  job or internship? Maybe our last round of advice didn’t work out for you (or maybe you’re just putting it off), but we have another helpful tip. A Facebook app called BranchOut  is a useful networking tool directly that can help you discover the work you’re looking for.

After adding this free app, you create a professional profile (think LinkedIn). You can then search for jobs based on industry, experience, tenure and location. The site was easy to use and navigate — you can quickly find a number of job opportunities. The most interesting aspect of this site was the ability to view the jobs of your Facebook friends (but only those who have also installed BranchOut). If you’re interested in a job at a company that a friend had worked for,you can message them to learn more about his or her experience at that company and ways to potentially secure a job there. It’s an easy way to create professional connections with Facebook friends.

Asad Esmail (MSB ’15) has been a marketing associate at BranchOut since February, and believes that the success of the site is due to the ability separate your professional and social lives. “Whenever you connect to your profile, even though it is attached to Facebook, none of your personal stuff is brought into it. No one has to worry about whether or not employees will see any of your photos or wall posts.”

I would highly recommend this site to any college student who is still seeking a summer job. It can’t hurt!

Photo: BranchOut

Join The Hoya!

Seriously though, do your laundry.

The Hoya is now accepting applications for new members. No matter what you’re interested in, we have a spot for you.

The Hoya has jobs in writing, photography, design, copyediting, marketing, sales, and finance. No prior experience needed! Because 4E is new on the scene, we’re looking to build a brand new staff full of smart, interested writers. If you like what you’ve seen so far, and want to get involved, contact me at [email protected].

Joining The Hoya is a great way to make friends, explore the city, and learn how a newspaper operates. The best way to get to know the business of journalism is to dive straight in, and The Hoya has been providing that opportunity at Georgetown for more than 90 years. With a current staff of over 100 students, we’re one of the biggest and best ways to get involved on campus.

Applications can be found at thehoya.com/contact/work-for-the-hoya and will remain open until January 25, 2012. If you have any questions for specific sections, feel free to contact them.