5 Snapchats You Definitely Got This Weekend

Weekend Snapchats

Picture this. It’s Sunday morning and find yourself waking up bright and early rolling out of bed around 11:30 a.m. with a pounding headache. Your Brita pitcher is all the way across the room in your fridge, which is obviously too difficult to get to, so you get back in bed and reach for your phone. It’s 5% charged, so naturally you use your dwindling battery power to check out your snaps and see what everyone else was up to last night. Here’s what you’re most likely to see:

  1. Unintelligibly Screaming Girls:  You have absolutely no idea what these girls are all screaming about, but they clearly seem pretty distressed. Was there a spider? Did Starbucks suddenly stop serving their specialty holiday drinks? Oh wait, they might just be attempting to sing “Blank Space” at the top of their lungs and horribly off-key. Either way, it’s too early for this much noise so you skip to the next snap before your eardrums burst.
  2. With Bae: What exactly is bae? Sometimes it’s a significant other and sometimes it’s Eat & Joy pizza, it all depends on who you ask. This snap with either remind you just how single you are or — more realistically — how quickly you could devour an entire pizza at the moment.
  3. #SoCollege: Some people just want to remind you that they’re in college, you know in case you forgot or something? That’s why they take every opportunity they can to document the #mostcollege things they see to send you over Snapchat. Vat of mystery punch? Crowded Village B dance party? Casual DFMO at Brown House? Basically the epitome of #College.
  4. “Havingtoook mcjh funnn”: This Snap will most likely be a selfie of someone who looks like they’ve been having a little too much fun all night long. You’ll crack a smile when you see this one and give yourself a little pat on the back because you’re probably having a better morning than this friend.
  5. Netflix Night: You’ll open this Snap and instantly dislike whoever sent it to you. While your friend may have captioned it “Night in!”, they might as well have written “Haha hope that headache doesn’t last all day!”. Forget about giving yourself a pat on the back as this snap serves as a reminder that you still have to write two essays and study for three midterms.

After looking through a few of the Snaps you received, your phone dies so you decide to crawl back under the covers. Waking up before noon is too difficult anyway …

Gifs: tumblr.com; Photo: thoughtcatalog.com

Mastering the Movie Night

Movie Night

Every now and then, even the most self-possessed Georgetown students will come to find themselves at the point where they just. Can’t. Even. Whether you’ve been #raging every night or you’ve spent so much time on Lau 5 that you’re starting to develop a fluorescent glow (’cause you know, here on the Hilltop we’re all about the Work-Hard-Play-Hard), what you really need is a healthy dose of downtime. Here at 4E, movie nights are one of our favorite ways to chill out after a long week on the daily grind – and we’re bringing you a list of the best ones, and how to do them right:

The Binge Night

Everything you do on Binge Night must be to absolute excess. Bury yourself in a mountain of pillows, then pick a classic series like Harry Potter or something absurd thrilling like Saw (things really pick up around number IV) and watch it through from start to finish. If you don’t consume at least 4,000 calories – I’m talking a large Domino’s pizza, a pint of Ben & Jerry’s per person, all the Wisey’s cookies (even oatmeal raisin) and a never-ending supply of cool ranch Doritos – you’re doing something wrong. Binge Nights typically end around 4 in the morning, when the last kid standing feebly finds the remote under one of his snoring friends, hits mute and promptly passes out on an empty box of donuts.

Also recommended: the Bourne series, The Fast & The Furious, Mission: Impossible, Transformers, Twilight, Lord of the Rings, the Scary Movies, James Bond

The Disney Night

Coming home to some milk & cookies and a Disney movie is just as satisfying after midterms week as it was back in the 90s after an arduous half-day at kindergarten. Take a trip down memory lane with a timeless pick from the Disney vault like The Lion King, or stay young and hip with the more recent hits like Up, Tangled, and Frozen (FYI: resisting Frozen does not make you cool/hipster). If you’re not into cartoons, there are plenty of awesome Disney Channel Original Movies (#tbt to the kids jumping on the blue film roll) that will make you wish you were ten again, when all your favorite celebs had yet to check into rehab.

Also recommended: Finding Nemo, The Parent Trap, Pocahontas, The Cheetah Girls, High School Musical, The Aristocats, The Lizzie McGuire Movie, Holes, The Princess Diaries, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Jungle Book

The Girls’ Night

Girls’ night is romantic comedy central. Grab your closest galpals, bust out the facemasks and copies of Cosmo, and snuggle up to a three-hour gossip sesh/pity party set against the dulcet tones of Dirty Dancing or Sweet Home Alabama. As awesome as Girls’ Night is, tread with care: it will inevitably leave you at best bemoaning the lack of Brads/Leos/Channings in the general DC area, and at worst texting that only semi-attractive kid in your Calc class with the hopes that he might be the Aaron Samuels to your Katie Cady Heron.

Also recommended: The Breakfast Club, Bridesmaids, Step Up, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, She’s the Man, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, John Tucker Must Die, Pretty Woman, Friends With Benefits

The FTB Night

The male equivalent to the RomCom fest, #ForTheBoys Night involves spending some quality time with your number one bros – no chicks allowed. Testosterone levels will be through the roof once everyone starts doing the Matthew McConaughey Wolf of Wall Street chant in unison whilst snacking on beef jerky.

Also recommended: the Batman trilogy, The Godfather, American Pie, Scarface, Superbad, Pulp Fiction, Inglorious Basterds, Animal House, Wedding Crashers, Remember the Titans, Gladiator

The Cultured Night

Cultured Night is the perfect opportunity for you and your friends to revel in the fact that you’re fancy and intellectual, because hey – you’re in college now! Gather round an obscure indie (or something slightly more mainstream) flick like The Grand Budapest Hotel, and dive into some fair-trade organic Trader Joe’s popcorn (the Kettle Corn is seeerrrriously good). You don’t really gets what’s going on, but you still feel really impressed with yourself because would you look at this artsy movie I’m watching!? If you’re feeling really brave, you might just even go foreign. Did someone say Sundance?

Also recommended: Chef, Rust and Bone, Her, The Master, El laberinto del fauno (Pan’s Labyrinth), Mean Streets, Le scaphandre et le papillon (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly)

The Wine Night

For those who are 21 and up, wine can be the perfect complement to a movie night at home.  Just as you drink different kinds of wine with different meals, so too must you carefully choose your grape in accordance with your featured genre.  That said, there is one specific wine-movie pair that stands out above the rest: Reds and Romance.  Let’s face it – it’s a cliché for a reason: crying hysterically over Titanic is so much more rewarding if you’re a little (or a lot) drunk.

Also recommended: The Notebook, Romeo & Juliet, The Last Song, Casablanca, The Fault in Our Stars, The English Patient, P.S. I Love You, The Time Traveler’s Wife

(Note: The principles of the Wine Night can be successfully applied to any of the nights mentioned above).

So those are some of 4E’s tested and approved movie nights. But feel free to gather your friends, grab some snacks and begin your own special movie night tradition!

Gifs: gurl.com, tumblr.com, elitedaily.com, reactiongifs.com; Photo: edu-cdn.com

Why We DON’T Miss High School

you don't miss hsNow that we’re all on spring break and some of us are home for the week, you’re probably feeling nostalgic and reflecting on your pre-college life, or you’re somewhere warm lying on a beach with your mind blank. If so, take a break from all that sun and read on anyway. You might miss some of your teachers and classmates and all the local spots where you used to hang out. Before you go wishing you could do it all over again, I’m here to remind you why you really don’t miss high school.

Class all day Whether you’re the type that likes to get up early and work out before class or you’d rather sleep the day away, I think we can all agree that classes from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. every day is NOT ideal.

Running into teachers outside of school Whether you lived in a small town or in a big city, we’ve all had awkward encounters running into our teachers on weekends or break. Whether it’s waiting in line at Starbucks, at the grocery store or the movie theater, it can be really disconcerting and totally awkward. Luckily, you’re not going to run into many professors at Leo’s.

The high school cafeteria We all hate on Leo’s now and then, but let’s be honest, it’s 10 times better than your high school cafeteria. Eating bagels or a salad for lunch five days straight is not the most exciting. Even if your cafeteria was really nice (that in itself is miraculous), I bet there was no make-your-own wok or pasta station. And let’s not forget about those omelets.

Standardized tests SATs, ACTs, SATII’s, AMCs, APs, the list of acronyms goes on and on. Yes, you might have to take the MCAT, GRE or LSAT while at Georgetown (good luck with that) but at least you’re not constantly bombarded with school-wide standardized testing.

Limited classes Want to take Italian, Arabic, Film Studies, International Relations and Astrology? Chances are your school didn’t have all of these. You were probably stuck with French or Spanish, and Latin if you were “lucky.” Even the largest high school couldn’t offer everything. My school didn’t have psychology, government or economics — awkward how those are now my major and minors.

Prom drama It’s that season again! If you’ve been at home and have younger siblings (I have two little sisters) you’ve definitely been hearing about all the prom angst. Who is going to ask me? What dress do I wear? What corsage should I get her? How do I rent a tux? Who is hosting after prom? It goes on and on. Luckily for us there isn’t much drama surrounding club formals or Dip Ball. College kids just want to have fun, right?

The uniform/dress code Yes, it was nice to be able to get up in the morning and not think so hard about what you want to wear. But sometimes you just want to roll out of bed in sweats or a tank top or pajamas. Chances are your high school didn’t let you wear those. Leggings didn’t suffice as pants in high school, which is really just a shame. Luckily for the public school kids, they are free to carry on scrubbing it as they always have.

Having friends that live far away Everyone had one friend who lived a couple towns over, or maybe even 45 minutes away. You couldn’t walk down the hall and knock on her door to borrow clothes, a spoon or some soap or to see if he wanted to hang out, watch a movie or go get dinner. The 10 minute walk to LXR seems like an eternity, but you used to have to put in a lot more effort to coordinate with your friends.

So, while I had some great times in high school, and I’m sure you all did too, don’t be fooled by the nostalgia; we all loved high school — sort of — but being at Georgetown is just way better.

Parental Advice: Then and Now

Should I Still Listen To My Parents

Fun Fact: Parents aren’t always right.

Un-Fun Fact: We should still listen to them …

As college students, we are all (begrudgingly) managing the transition from childhood to adulthood. It’s time to substitute out juice boxes for cocktails, playdates for meetings and 8pm bed times for all-nighters. We spent our mischievous younger years Cool-Cute-Kids-Pics-by-cool-imagesoscillating between respecting and neglecting our parents’ advice but, in order to succeed as “adults”, we must take our parents’ advice with a grain of salt and choose for ourselves: should I still listen to my parents’ advice in college? 

Parental Advice #1: Don’t talk to strangers.

In college, this piece of advice turns from a harmless safety tip to social suicide. College is the time to spark a conversation with tons of complete strangers because otherwise you’re doomed to a life alone with one-too many cats. Meow.

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Parental Advice #2: Sharing is caring.

Have you heard of a little something I like to call mono? Beware, don’t share – especially if it’s a red Solo Cup.

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Parental Advice #3: Always use the buddy system.

In college, the safety mantra goes: never walk home alone. This is still valid: two is always better than one.

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Parental Advice #4: Do your homework.

Or don’t … and say you did!

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Parental Advice #5: Keep your hands to yourself.

College parties and 18+ clubs can get more handsy than a four-year-old at the Please Touch Museum. But please, respect others’ space. Hands where we can see ’em.

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Parental Advice #6: Ask anyway – there’s no such thing as a stupid question.

Don’t be afraid to ask a question in class, other people might also be confused. But do make sure you’re asking because you didn’t understand the teacher’s explanation, not because you weren’t paying attention. If that’s the case, just ask your friend Google or wait for office hours.

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Parental Advice #7: Manners matter. 

Amen. Can I get a please and thank you for holding that super heavy Lau door open for you?

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Parental Advice #8: You have to finish your dinner before you have dessert.

False,  dessert isn’t a “reward” for eating a balanced meal; it’s one of the major college food groups and something Leo’s consistently gets right.

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The examples above demonstrate that our parents’ advice can become antiquated as we get older but, in some other cases, their advice holds more true now than ever before. It’s up to us to choose whether or not to live according to our parents’ old advice. We may not be kids anymore, but we are still kids at heart. Which is why I have this gif of a cat for you to look at:

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Photos: Cool Images, Mashable, WordPress

7 Questions with Take Back The Night

Seven questions with take back the night

Since 1975, women have been holding Take Back the Night events and combatting sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and sexual abuse. In 2001, Take Back the Night was officially established as a non-profit organization dedicated to those causes.

The Month of April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and as part of its campaign to end sexual and domestic violence, Georgetown University Take Bake The Night (GU TBTN) is holding Take Back The Night Week from April 8-12. To learn more about TBTN Week, sexual assault on college campuses, and most importantly, what Hoyas can do to combat gender-based violence, we sat down with Deanna Arthur (SFS ’14) and Kat Kelley (NHS ’14), Co-Chairs of GU TBTN, and Mary Toscano (COL ’14), Domestic Violence Liaison for GU TBTN.

What is GU TBTN and what is its focus?

“GU TBTN is an advocacy organization focused on fighting gender-based violence,” said Kelley. “Our main goal is to provide awareness and education about these types of violence. We really want to get people talking and thinking about these issues. We put on the Vagina Monologues every year, we do movie screenings and we especially put our focus on the month of April which is Sexual Assault Awareness Month.”

Currently, GU TBTN is leading numerous initiatives to raise awareness about sexual and domestic violence. According to Toscano, “We’ve done a lot of lobbying with other organizations for the reauthorization for the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). We had a petition and, for us, it was really important to educate other students about VAWA. Another thing that we’re working on is an event specifically devoted to Domestic Violence that will take place during TBTN Week. We’re going to photograph people in Red Square holding signs and the whole purpose of the event is to incorporate people from different perspectives.” The event will feature members from GU Pride, international groups and other student organizations.

Though it is something that is commonly talked about, many people don’t know what sexual assault really is. What is the real definition sexual assault?

“Legally sexual assault is any unwanted sexual touching,” said Kelley, “It’s especially defined by the experience of the survivor. There’s not one situation or one act that defines it. If an unwanted sexual experience causes this type of trauma in the survivor, it’s something that needs to be dealt with legitimacy.”

Arthur mentioned that sexual assault is a prevalent issue on college campuses, including here at Georgetown. “The statistic says that 1 in 4 college women will be sexually assaulted, and for Georgetown, the statistic is similar,” said Arthur. “For adult males, it’s 1 in 33. There aren’t as many statistics for college age males—and sexual assaults in males are significantly underreported. That’s the other thing—the 1 in 4 statistic is just the statistic that has been reported. So it’s definitely an issue– even here. Many people think that here at Georgetown, we don’t have to worry about these things, ‘it’s something distant, it’s something foreign.’ But it happens and it happens in a lot of different forms… we’re not immune from it.”

When is GU TBTN Week, and what events will it include?

TBTN Week is going to be held from April 8-13 and our thesis for this year’s TBTN Week is ‘It’s Not a Woman’s Issue, It’s a Hoya’s Issue,’ said Arthur. Our goal is to reach out to different student groups and get them actively involved in this year’s events and raise awareness on campus about gender-based violence.

Here is the line-up for the week’s events:

Monday, April 8 Kickoff in Red Square with the Corp Service Outreach Committee
Monday, April 8 Evening  Two bloggers from Feministing will address students about Rape Culture and Sexual Assault

Tuesday, April 9 Screening of The Invisible War and focus on rape in the military
“We really want to show that sexual assault has an effect on everybody, even places like the military, where you wouldn’t normally associate with sexual assault,” said Kelley.

Wednesday, April 10 The Week’s flagship event, ‘It Happens Here’

Thursday, April 11 Domestic Violence Awareness with numerous student organizations

Friday, April 12 Partnering with Health Education Services Hoya Health Hut which will involve pledging to not partake in sexual violence

What is ‘It Happens Here’ and how can Hoyas become involved with the event?

It Happens Here is an program that will feature the experiences of members of the Georgetown Community. According to Arthur, “We’ve reached out to social media to collect anonymous stories and insight from survivors, allies and bystanders on campus. In addition, we’ve developed a blog piece that we’ve released on the Georgetown Women’s Center Blog and Feminists at Large, and we’re also going post that on the Corp Service and Outreach Committee.”

“Most importantly, said Arthur, “we also have a Google Form to collect anonymous submissions for the event. Everything is going to go through our contacts in the Women’s Center and we want to reassure everyone that the whole program is going to be put together delicately. On the submission forms, we have a lot of links to the resources on campus. We really want people here to be aware of campus resources. We want to take these stories– whether it’s a survivor of an assault here at Georgetown or what it’s like to hear rape jokes or to be an ally or a friend—what they experienced, what they saw, what they wish they could have done better– and raise awareness on campus.

To access the Google Form and submit a personal experience, click here. Remember, all stories will be anonymous and handled with the utmost discretion.

How can we combat sexual assault on campus?

According to Toscano, some of the biggest problems with sexual assault today stem from societal stigmas and preconceived ideas. “We need to shift the focus on perpetrators, not victims,” said Toscano, “and we need to refocus the way we ask our questions and react to these events.”

Kelley said that we continue to ask the wrong questions when it comes to gender based violence. “We ask things like ‘What were you wearing?’, ‘What were you doing that night?’, ‘Why were you with that person?’ and ‘Why were you drinking that much?'”

“We also have all these societal myths,” said Kelley. “These include: ‘She was asking for it…’ or
‘He didn’t mean to…’ or ‘This type of thing only happens to women and only men perpetrate it.'” According to the girls, the most important thing when dealing with a sexual assault survivor is to believe them and reject preconceived myths about sexual assault.

Above all else, the girls wanted to spread the word about the wealth of resources on campus for both women and men. These resources can provide Housing and Academic Accommodations for survivors of sexual violence.

Resources include:

-Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Counselors, Bridget Sherry, who works with ESCAPE and Health Education Services and Carol Day, who is Director of Health Education Services

-The Women’s Center (Located on the third floor of the Leavey Center)

CAPS

“What’s key is that survivors have a safe space,” said Kelley. “If they want to tell a friend, or a chaplain, or a professor, or someone they are close to. It’s all about doing what feels safe and comfortable for them.”

For more information on GU TBTN, TBTN Week or Resources on the Georgetown Campus, like Georgetown Take Back The Night on Facebook or email them at [email protected]