Predicting a Freshman’s Georgetown Day

Banner - ForecastWell friends, it’s that time of year: the last week of classes. We’re almost to the point where we don’t have to go class every day of the week. Summer is so close, yet so far (because of the gloom of finals that hangs over our head). But fear not! There’s something even closer than finals that shines a little lot of light on our lives: Georgetown Day. There’s only one thing we at 4E can say about God’s springtime gift to us:

Actually, there’s a lot more we can say about Georgetown Day (just search it on our site). As a fledgling in September, I could only dream of Georgetown Day. I heard so much about it from upperclassmen. They talked about how it was like the Homecoming of the Spring, how it was a free pass to skip class to have the time of your life on a weekday and how it symbolized another terrific year coming to an end. I figured it had to be a great day. If it was anything like Homecoming, things were sure to get…crazy. However, I could not truly know what they were talking about since I still had not yet experienced it. But here we are. It’s time to celebrate in true Homecoming fashion:

*Only if you’re 21+, of course*

As I’m sure many other freshmen have not yet experienced Georgetown Day (and to those who have, congrats, but you’re still in our grade), I have composed a series of forecasts. Weather? Unimportant. I’m forecasting what may (or, disclaimer: may NOT) happen to you on this fateful day:

  1. Black out or back out. You’re at it from the get-go. One of your clubs starts partying at 7 AM and you are there right on time. You throw back some mimosas and before you know it, you switch to some stronger liquids. DANGEROUS, but you still pull through. The morning flies by and soon you’re strolling across campus, out of your mind feeling ~young, wild and free~. In the back of your mind, you know that there are going to be some pretty bad pictures of you the next day. You start to feel a bit more normal and decide to nap. But wait. You get dragged to another party before you can go sleep, but luckily the bouncer turns you away. Next, you run into another upperclassmen in your club (that met at 7 AM), and she convinces you to return to the party. Before you know, you’re back at it again. You later text some of your friends to see who’s up for Leo’s because at this point, food is the only option. One of them responds, so you leave the party…and you wake up in your bed at 2 AM, alone and confused. How did you get there? No one knows. Not even you. You had fun during the day, but regret the fact that you went too hard and could not keep going. Overall, you consider your day to not be a win.
  2. Black out and DON’T back out. You’re a champion. Your Georgetown Day experience is basically the same as that of #1, except you don’t retire to your room at 5 PM. One might compare this experience to the opening of Dylan Thomas’s poem Do not go gentle into that good night because, like the persona says, you “rage, rage against the dying of light.” Nothing drags you down. You apparently make it to several parties and live out the saying “lights on, no one’s home,” because your mind is just not in a good place. Your friends inform you of your actions the next morning, but you look back on the day with no regrets. You know that you killed it, and you are proud of your freshmen year finale.
  3. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. This is, arguably, the best route to take on this glorious day. It’s the advice most upperclassmen give to freshmen when darties happen. You do not go too hard throughout the day; instead, you keep a nice feeling going for the entire day and maybe even part of the night. There is not a single moment when you’re feeling too out of control or too subdued. You have the time of your life and remember everything. Your day comes to a close, and you lie in your bed, absently smiling at the ceiling as you look on over your perceived victory. You made it through Georgetown Day alive and spent the entire celebration with your friends! At the moment, you feel like you just finished the best day of your life.
  4. Becoming Nurse Ratchet. You spend the day painfully sober, taking care of your friends who need a certain type of assistance. Instead of becoming Nurse Ratched from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, you become Nurse Ratchet because…well, you know why this term applies here. Although I am all for helping friends, it would be not be very fun to take this route.

    Take care of them if necessary, but make sure you have fun too.

I, for one, am beyond excited for Friday. I think it’s going to be an ~interesting~ experience, especially if I and my classmates decide to go to our Problem of God section at 1 PM. The forecasts listed above give a general outline of how the day may go. Of course, anything could happen. There is always room for surprises on days like these. Which path will you take (or which will take you)?

Photos/Gifs: giphy.com, wruf.com

‘Twas the Night Before Georgetown Day

twas

T-Minus 1 hour and 23 minutes until Georgetown Day 2014 is upon us and most Hoyas are getting to bed early to prepare for tomorrow’s festivities. We stumbled upon this ingenious status by Ben Maher (SFS ’15) on Facebook and wanted to share its brilliance with the campus. Enjoy!

‘Twas the Night Before Georgetown Day

‘Twas the night before Georgetown Day, when all thro’ Lau 2,
Not a student in sight, they had no work to do;
Hoyas were nestled all snug in their bunks,
Eager to wake up at dawn and get drunk.

Too anxious to sleep, their hearts filled with wonder,
Which among them would be first to chunder;
Salmon shorts hung in the closet with care
In hopes that the keg-and-eggs would soon be there.

And I settled in for some light springtime snoozin’
To catch a little rest ‘fore a long day of boozin’
When on Healy Lawn there arose such a clatter,
I got up and looked to see what was the matter.

Out the window I saw through a blanket of fog
A priest with a mullet, at his feet a bulldog;
I dashed out the door, I couldn’t be quicker,
‘Twas ol’ Johnny Carroll, arms laden with liquor!

The bottles, they clinked and the beer cans, they clanked;
His stumbling gait revealed how much he’d drank;
He put on a bro tank and let out a yell
To be heard from Leo’s to the halls of Darnall.

“Now, André! Now, Franzia! Now, Jack and Jim Beam!
On, Natty! On, Keystone! On, Burnett’s Whipped Cream!”
From the Village A rooftops to White-Gravenor Hall,
Now, drink away! Drink away! Drink away all!”

Then he called me over with a chuckle so hearty
And conjured a vision of the upcoming darty:
There were girls in sundresses splayed out on the lawn;
Freshmen, hunched over toilets, already were gone.

Healy’s grand clock hands bathed in golden rays
While bros stumbled ‘neath in a deep drunken haze;
In ICC classrooms, to professors’ chagrin,
Students sipped out of coffee cups filled all with gin.

And Henle’s ol’ courtyard, so dark and so ratty,
Shone with the luster of crushed cans of Natty;
From up in his tower Jack DeGoia watched
All his happy Hoyas, so free and debauched.

And I knew, feelin’ buzzed in the fair April weather,
How liquor and sun brings the whole school together.
But then Jack the Bulldog gave out a quick bark,
And this glorious vision soon faded to dark.

Johnny Carroll bent down and rubbed the dog’s head,
And before they both vanished, a few words he said;
Grumblin’ and mumblin’ was all that I heard;
He was pretty wasted, his speech was all slurred;
But as to his meaning, well, I have a hunch:
“Happy Georgetown Day to all, and to all a drunk brunch!”

And this version from 2012 by Adam Ramadan (SFS ’14):

‘Twas the night before Georgetown Day, no more a line at Towne
Not a creature was stirring, well maybe a rat at house Brown.
The fridges were stocked, Natty Light all the way,
In hopes that the administration would let us all play.

The students were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of inflatables bounced in their heads.
The security guard in his outfit, and I with my books,
Crossing each other, cold as I shook.

When out on Healy Lawn arose such a clatter,
I sprang from Lauinger to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Peered out of Lau 4 and damn near almost crashed.

Healy Clock on the breast of the new-fallen lawn,
Gave beauty of Georgetown Day past to objects thereon.
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a wonderful keg and a beer garden, don’t fear!

With a little old tap, so sturdy and quick,
I knew in a moment this was very ironic.
More rapid than I could have come up with a dream,
I saw in my eyes that silver keg gleam!

Now Natty! now, Keystone! now, Blue Moon and Hatter!
On Shock Top! on Budweiser, don’t continue to clamor!
To the top of Village A! To the top of LXR!
Now Dash away! Dash away! Dash away far!

As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly,
When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky.
So up to the rooftops the Georgetown students flew,
With fridges full of beer, and Jack Junior too.

And then, in a twinkling, I heard a seesaw,
The prancing and clawing of many a paw.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Down the chimney Jack the Bulldog came with a sound.

He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot,
And his clothes were all tarnished from flip-cup and Beirut!
A bundle of goods he had flung on his back,
And he looked like a barista, just opening his pack.

His eyes-how they twinkled! His wrinkles how merry!
His paws were like roses, his nose like a cherry!
His slobbery little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the hairs of his chin were painted like day-glow.

The body of the orange he held tight in his teeth,
And the orange juice it spilled surrounded him beneath.
He had a broad face and a little round belly,
That shook when he barked, because he knew Syracuse was jelly!

He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old bulldog,
And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of his drool, dawg.
A wink of his eye and a dip of his head,
Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.

He spoke not a word, but looked rather honest,
Then muttered “Georgetown Day is what you make, so get on it!”
And laying his paw aside the dark night,
And giving a nod, his golf-kart did ignite!

He sprang to his cart, to Jack’s Crew he gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ‘ere he drove out of sight,
“Happy Georgetown Day to all, and to all a good-night!”