5 Questions I Have for Georgetown While Abroad

Hello, Hoyas on the Hilltop and abroad. I am currently studying in Hong Kong, and well, even across the Pacific, I still see snaps and get email updates, so all in all, I have a lot of questions.

  1.  WHAT IS THE NEW LEO’S LIKE?? Is the food good? Is the renovation lovely? Are there lines? How is the food? What is your favorite “station” or whatever you call the different dining options upstairs? How do you like the food?
  2. How long is the line at Chick-fil-A? Last year at 3pm the masses would convene in Hoya Court to hit up Subway, Così and the other two or three places at which you could use a meal swipe. I’m assuming that whenever Chick-fil-A opens there is a large line. How do you pass the time? Do you wonder why it is not open on Sunday’s? Do you contemplate the Problem of God?
  3.  Where is the new Uncommon Grounds?
  4.  Does Patrick Ewing enjoy being back at campus? Honestly, I bet we’re all asking that. And also wondering will this be our year to make it to the NIT March Madness?~Coach Ewing enjoying himself at his 1985 Georgetown graduation~
  5.  And when did we become a football school? Now, I’m not a math major, but if you add Georgetown football  to RFK stadium, we are still not a state school.  I guess pretending we’re a football school for a day will have to do until we turn into one.

Roll Hoyas!

Photos/Gifs: Giphy.com, Quickmeme.com, redbubble.net, hoyas2015.georgetwon.edu, wikitravel.com

6 Things I Learned About Georgetown While Abroad

Did I mention I studied abroad?

Step off of the Hilltop and outside of the Georgetown Bubble, and you will find many things to learn, do and see. The decision to “study” abroad was undoubtedly one of the best decisions I have ever made in my life.  Even so, the Hilltop certainly had me homesick: Georgetown has so many incredible things to offer; from expert faculty to your first New South pregame.

One of the strange parts about being abroad was learning about Georgetown. In fact, there are many things about my home university that I only realized after going to Milan. Some were good things, and others, not so much…

  1. We all like to poke fun at and react excessively to the swarms of  students smoking outside of Lau. Emerging from Lau, you may find yourself in a situation like this:Instead, the EXACT depiction of what students do in Europe is below. They are the real smokers: they don’t just do it to look cool, but they actually like cigarettes. Get ready for secondhand smoke.In reality, we don’t have much to complain about as non-smokers at Georgetown, since it seems most smokers here don’t fall into the latter category. We are nowhere near as threatened by secondhand smoke at Georgetown as we complain we are.
  2. Our coffee on campus is TERRIBLE. Paying at minimum $3.00 for burnt and stale coffee is not ever justifiable. I don’t even know if stale is an appropriate way to describe coffee, but I shouldn’t have to wonder. Case in point: my abroad university in Italy had vending machines that made better coffee than our campus baristas. Just another thing that machines do better. Since caffeine is such an important part of the student experience in college, its time to up our game.
  3. We need to give more credit to how beautiful and put-together our campus is. Campuses in the states are exceptional; from the manicured lawns, to the behind-the-scenes campus planning, to the sense of ownership the students take, it’s hard to not appreciate how much we’ve got. Instead, even my (nice and relatively expensive) Italian university had graffiti and was not managed nearly as well as Georgetown. Construction definitely gets old on campus, but it’s always for the better (except maybe the Thompson Center and the architectural disaster that is Lau).

    A tulip endowment is good for ~something~.
  4. You’re much more likely to feel supported at Georgetown than anywhere else. While we like to complain about stress and sub-par faculty at many points in our academic careers, try having a class whose syllabus doesn’t even tell you who your teacher is or where your class meets. At least we have capable (i.e. non-tenured) faculty that know what they’re doing. I complain about preregistration results as much as the next person, but try having not one, but two of your classes cancelled for good two weeks into the semester. How do students at a university that does that function (answer: they don’t)?
  5. WE HAVE SO MUCH MORE WORK. European academics are in fact whack. In all cases, I had just one assignment for each one of my classes: an oral final exam. At Georgetown, we have countless tests, multiple midterms, homework, essays, group projects (the list goes on).
    @everday during months-long midterm “season”

    The moral of the story is that Georgetown is perhaps harder than it really needs to be.

  6. Our campus and neighborhood is even less lit than we realize. Doesn’t need much explanation.

    The ONLY establishment with the name “bar” in it within a mile of Georgetown.
Alcatraz Club, a Milanese mainstay, doesn’t even need people to be lit.

Did I mention I studied abroad?

 

Photos/Gifs: tumblr.com, giphy.com, otnemea.com, flickr.com, residentadvisor.net

 

2016 Presidential Nominees As GUSA Presidents

Banner - 2016 GUSABy this point, we are all well aware of who this year’s presidential nominees will be. Like ’em or not, barring some extreme circumstance or ~political revolution~, either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will be moving into prime D.C. real estate early next year.

The average Georgetown student is pretty politically savvy, but for those of us who aren’t, 4E has created a guide to the nominees by making them a little more relevant to Georgetown. Here are what the candidates’ platforms and personas would be if they were running for Georgetown University Student Association President instead:

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The Likely Democratic Nominee, Hillary Clinton:

  • Creation of a new email system. Google Apps was glitchy, anyways.
  • Officially recognize H*yas for Choice.
  • Someone will tell her to lower tuition, and she will give in.
  • The number of Georgetown students getting Wall Street internships will increase tenfold.
  • Public Safety Alerts about attacks on students may disappear mysteriously.
  • Incentivize more speakers to come to campus by paying them hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  • Jack the Bulldog will wear a pantsuit.hillsuits
  • The front gates remain open.
  • If GUASFCU fails, it must be bailed out.
  • GUSA Vice President will get into battles on Facebook with opposing campaigns.
  • #1 Customer of The Corp, yet has a problem with the way it operates.
  • Already had a seat in her classes before the class primaries (i.e. pre-registration).

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The Presumptive Republican Nominee, Donald Trump:

  • Studying abroad in any country that participates in international trade deals is no longer allowed.
  • Build a giant wall around campus, and close the front gates.
  • Somehow gets all of his classes during preregistration, stunning even the registrar.
  • Will apply for financial aid, then default on his student loans.
  • New Corp storefronts: a casino, a vineyard and a steakhouse.
  • His possible Vice Presidential nominee may close the Key Bridge.
  • Model UN will receive no funding and be removed from CSE budgets.
  • The entire campus is a free speech zone.
  • Shut down the Qatar campus and relocate it to Tel Aviv.
  • Repeal and replace the student insurance waiver.
  • Will actually enforce the 100% ID check on GUTS buses.
  • Will cut tuition and funding for campus news outlets (Dishonest media!)
  • Attack Villanova hard and fast. They have been beating us badly, folks.trumpdunk

Perhaps this will help you make your decision, or it might have just frustrated/annoyed/perplexed/(insert your feeling here) you, but in any case, just remember to VOTE!

Note: Neither The Hoya nor The Fourth Edition officially endorses candidates for political office or otherwise.

Photos/Gifs: reddit.com, giphy.com

Quiz: Where Should You Study Abroad?

Banner - Study Abroad QuizSure, the words “studying abroad” bring up other fearsome ideas, like “applications,” “language requirements” and “expensive,” but in reality, many Hoyas will say that the experience is once-in-a-lifetime and life-changing. In reality, one of your biggest challenges, though, will be deciding where to spend your time overseas. Take this 4E quiz to figure out (with 100% certainty, of course), what country or region is best suited for you:

[playbuzz-game game=”https://www.playbuzz.com/isvtvk10/where-should-you-study-abroad”]

Photos: brainscape.com

 

You Know You’re Abroad When…

UntitledIf you are currently abroad, have studied abroad or will be studying abroad, then here are some phrases that you are, or will become, very familiar with. One of your very own 4E bloggers (moi) is in France for the semester (basic, I know) and here are some very real sentences that my fellow American classmates and I have totally said.

“I found wifi!!!”

“Omg that place sells iced coffee, I haven’t had that in 3 months!”

Where is my Starbucks red cup?

“I won’t go crazy with my Snapchat story even though I’m spending this weekend in Portugal.”….100 seconds of Snapchats later….

“Hey, I’m bringing a bottle of wine over for dinner. It was only 3 euros (or whatever currency you are using).”

Advice: Never trust wine that is cheaper than water

“I don’t have any work tonight, so let’s go out!” (someone says every night)

“Do you speak English?”

“Is the tap water safe?” (first thing you say to your Airbnb host, after you ask for the wifi password of course)

“Is that what we really sound like?” (you say as you see another group of American abroad students)

Most likely, yes, that is what you sound like.

Even though #abroadlife is the life, we do miss America and, especially, our fellow Hoyas at Georgetown. Although I may sound like a broken record, anyone who has the opportunity to study abroad, whether it is for a summer, semester or year, should definitely do so!

Photos/Gifs: giphy.com, tumblr.com, uwp.edu

Georgetown-Themed Halloween Costumes

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It is that time of year again Hoyas, Halloween. Right now, you are most likely scrambling to find a costume that is both “cute” and “funny” — AKA the incredible feat. Why not rep Georgetown this holiday season? Here are some ideas to get the ideas flowing:

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1. A Go-Card. This costume is especially easy since we all have a model of what it should look like (unless you lost it). Steal a piece of cardboard from Prospect Street on Thursday as Friday is recycling day and there is bound to be something you can use. Grab some blue and while paint, and cut out a whole for your face. Extra points if you use yourself to swipe into a dorm.

2. The Omelet Lady. Does she still exist? I haven’t been to Leo’s in about a century. Nonetheless, she is for sure the most important person on this campus because she controls the omelets, AKA the only cure to your Sunday hangover. Carry around a pan, those little omelet order slips and scream “Get ya omelet” at everyone you see. Extra points if you bring me an omelet.

3. Georgetown Study Abroad Student. If you are a junior, it is very likely that a large majority of your friend group is off being “cultural” right now. Why not #TBT to them and go as a Italy/France/Spain/Ireland/Australia/WHATEVER study abroad student? All you need is a selfie stick and a “new found view of the world.”

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4. A Corp Barista. The easiest one on the list! If you have ever bought a coffee, tea, chai or whatever you fancy at a Corp location, you know the baristas have a certain style that will never go out of style. Throw on an artsy/hipster outfit (bonus points for overalls) and a backwards hat and you are golden. You should 100% carry around a coffee, as well.

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Photos/Gifs: giphy.com; tumblr.com; whicdn.com; instagram.com

How to Study Abroad in D.C.

washington_dc__washington_dc__district_of_columbia

The application for studying abroad in Fall 2015 is quickly approaching on Feb. 10. However, we realize that for some of you, the very thought of filling out yet another application might inspire several days of straight-out-of-the-carton Ben & Jerry’s consumption in an unlit dorm room.

Have no fear! 4E has a solution to your application woes with several ways for you to study abroad without ever leaving this state city federal district we call home.

We researched some of the best and most popular places to study abroad (research=consulting BuzzFeed, answerer of all of life’s inquiries), and then devised alternatives right here in DC.

Don’t bother paying for flights and dealing with the hassle of actually traveling to a foreign country, having a life changing experience, immersing yourself in different cultures and learning about the world. With the help of our advice, you can do basically the same thing while still having the option of returning to your cozy dorm room every night and watching Netflix for 5 hours.

Here are the best ways to study abroad in DC:

  1. Australia. Who would want to take the 20-hour flight to Australia when you can have basically the same experience right here on Georgetown’s campus? That’s right, instead of traveling all the way to Australia, you can just wander down to the brand new volleyball court in Southwest Quad, which they decided to build in the middle of winter. Australia has lots of sand. So does the volleyball court. You know what Australia also has? Poisonous snakes.
vb
Walking distance from Leo’s!
Not walking distance from Leo’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winner: Volleyball Court 

  1. Shanghai, China. Why go all the way to China when you can just hop on the Metro and go to Chinatown? Although Chinatown has the totally authentic Chinese arch, we’ve noticed that the area itself is kind of a scam: most of the stores are just American retailers with signs in Chinese lettering. If you’re looking to remedy the situation with quality Chinese food, unfortunately, DC’s options leave much to be desired. By the time you get the motivation to venture out into suburbia for more authentic cuisine, you might as well have just taken the flight to China to get the real thing.
Chinatown, DC Arch
What happens when you google “Shanghai Arch”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winner: Actual China

  1. Cape Town, South Africa. South Africa is in Africa (it’s even in the name!). Also in Africa: Ethiopia. According to seriouseats.com DC is one of the world’s best places to find Ethiopian food, “second only to Addis Ababa”. With the many Ethiopian restaurants in DC, including Meskerem, Dukem and Ethiopic, you could probably spend an entire semester eating at a different restaurant every night. While this sounds compelling, the total cost of all that injera bread and doro wat would probably add up to a round-trip plane ticket, and spending a semester exploring South Africa does sound pretty rad.
Ethiopian food=rad
Ethiopian food=rad
Cape Town=also rad

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winner: Spend the Fall semester eating your weight in tibs and the Spring semester in Cape Town (the weather is better!). End the year with negative dollars to your name.

  1. London, England. London is basically the same as America, except more cloudy and with more tea. Also, we beat them in the Revolutionary War. Instead of going to London, just marathon Harry Potter and Sherlock.
'Murica
‘Murica

Winner: USA! USA! USA!

  1. Madrid, Spain. I don’t really have an argument for this one. You should probably just go to Spain. I mean, look at this city.

And these churros with chocolate.

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Also, Enrique is from Madrid.

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Winner: Just go to Madrid.

 In conclusion, you should probably suck it up and fill out that study abroad application, unless you’ve been convinced to take advantage of the severely underused volleyball court. DC is great, but the opportunity to see other parts of the world and have amazing experiences is greater. So go to https://studyabroad.georgetown.edu/, take a deep breath, and finish filling out that application. I believe in you. And so does Enrique.

Pictures/Gifs: giphy.com, Flickr.com, Shutterstock.com, alpineservices.com, jllproperty.com, humanandnatural.com

Campus Confusions: Post-Study Abroad

A4_HFSCopening_DanielSmith

As the semester starts off and all Georgetown students are frantically getting back into the swing of things, there is one group of people who are having a tougher time than most.

Yes, you guessed it, the fall study abroad gang are the most frantic of the students this lovely first day of classes.

Between moving into rooms all over campus to brief hellos in front of Healy, the amount of stress and anxiety is ridiculous.

As I am coming back from abroad too, I am suffering from many campus confusions.

1. The Construction. Let’s be real. This is ridiculous and super difficult to get used to. Speaking as a resident of Henle, I can say the situation is a “no bueno.”

2. The Healey Family Student Center. ALL THE BEAUTY. I still don’t understand what it is or what it does, but I already love it. Next question, what is the appropriate name? Heal Fam Stu Cen is my personal favorite, but I don’t want to look like a newbie.

3. New Students. Excuse me, who are all of these people? Do they even go here? And why does everyone look so so young? Have I gotten old? Or are they all just geniuses?

4. The Weather. Literally are we being punk’d? Why is it so incredibly cold? I actually froze walking across campus today. It is colder than Copenhagen.

5. New American slang. My friends and I have realized that we have missed out on some key phrases that have been added to this beautiful language of ours. Excuse me, but what is “on fleek”? Is that like a compliment? So beyond confused.

For all of you who were abroad, you understand my problems. For those of you who were not, please help us out. We are going to need it.

Happy first day of classes, Hoyas.

Photos/Gifs: The Hoya; Tumblr.com

Goodbye Study Abroad

study-abroad2

If you’ve been abroad this semester, by now you have probably bought your last budget airline ticket, bargained for your last “international piece of clothing” and filled up on whatever native food is your fancy (baklava, I will miss you).

You know what time it is: the end of study abroad. Some have been waiting for this moment since September, others wished it would never come. Nonetheless, it’s here. So it’s time to accept it. Soon you will be surrounded by your old Georgetown friends, bundled in your preppy winter clothes and doing the best you can to avoid the hellish Lau.

For some, this can be a very difficult change to deal with. Wine and beer will not be served regularly with meals, everything will be in English and you will have actual work to do.

In order to make the transition a little easier, here are some expert tips:

1. Plan study abroad reunions. You have been living with these people for 4 months now. At least in my program, we are basically a family (a weird, twisted family). Appoint someone as the “social coordinator” and have some amazing theme parties. It will be like studying abroad all over again, for like 4 hours. Extra points if you end the night back in the country you studied abroad in.

2. Make an American playlist. Get yourself hyped for the land of the free and the home of unlimited data. Make sure to add all your “pro-USA” songs. Because nothing screams America like Miley Cyrus’ “Party in the USA”.

party-in-the-usa-o

3. Say goodbye to all the sights. This is probably the last time you will see these classic landmarks for a while so make sure to take your “goodbye pictures”. My first photo stop? The Starbucks on Ataturk street. So many memories, I will never find another place like it.

4. Speak only in the native language. Whether you have become proficient in the language this semester or just struggled along, use these last couple of days to prove your abilities, or lack thereof. When worst comes to worst, just say a bunch of words really fast in some kind of accent. The natives won’t know the difference.

5. Write a final blog post. I truly applaud those of you who have kept up with blogging over the last 4 months. Make sure to write an emotional, heart wrenching final reflection. Personally I wrote mine during history class and teared up a little.

Troy-Community-Emotions

Remember, despite your emotions right now towards your semester and study abroad location, you will at some point treasure this experience. Maybe you found your calling, maybe the love of your life or maybe you just found yourself. But that is none of my business; unless you want to gossip, then I’m ALL ears.

Signing off from Alanya, Turkey. See you in the place where the drinking age is 21 and the language barrier doesn’t exist.

Gifs: http://stream1.gifsoup.com/view/37874/party-in-the-usa-o.gif; http://www.headoverfeels.com/2014/01/23/a-gif-appreciation-of-troy-barnes/

Photo: https://www.brainscape.com/blog/2014/11/think-study-abroad-will-make-you-fluent/

Hump Day Chomp: Study Space Edition

humpdaychomp

If you’ve already started studying for finals, you know that nothing fights the study blues quite like a good snack. Here are a few off-campus locations that combine delicious food with a convenient and comfortable study space.

1. Open City

Located on the grounds of the National Cathedral, this is the sister café of popular study spot Tryst. It opened today (12/10) and offers cool tables and breakfast food, sandwiches and salads. They also have WiFi, which is such an added bonus.

2. Panera

Just a GUTS bus ride away, Panera Bread in Dupont has an entire downstairs level with booths, tables and a ton of outlets for all your charging needs. They are currently running a promotion offering any baked good for $0.99 (these usually are $2+) with the purchase of an entree and drink. 4E recommends the chicken and avocado Cobb salad or any type of soup in a bread bowl (duh). They also have an extensive breakfast menu served until 10:30 a.m.

3. Farmers Fishers Bakers

Facing the scenic Potomac waterfront and well known for a really cool (expensive) weekend brunch, Farmers Fishers Bakers also offers a really cheap weekday breakfast menu. You can order and hang out with free WiFi from 7:30 to 10:00 am. Also, the cinnamon buns are to die for.

These places will help you gently break the bubble during finals week as you discover new food and maybe a new favorite study space. Be brave and venture off campus — it’s a great way to avoid the kids you don’t like at school and quickly experience some of the D.C. culture.