GTFO: Hidden Study Spots in DC

GTFO

GTFO is back, and here to help you find more ways to leave campus. With finals coming up

Oops, where was I? Anyways, with finals coming up, 4E has decided to help you find free hidden study spots throughout DC. If caffeine isn’t your thing, don’t fret! There are plenty of non-coffee-shop ways to escape the soul-sucking monstrosity that is Lau, the primal fights that arise when two pre-med students fight over a booth in Regents and the smug looks thrown your way out the windows of the MSB castle after your GoCard stops working at midnight.

LET ME IN MSB

Here are some of the best places to enhance your studying by exploring DC:

1. The Bishop’s Garden: Pilgrim Rd Washington, DC 20016

What is it: The Bishop’s Garden is located in the back of the National Cathedral, a short two-mile walk from campus.

Why you should go: It’s a great place to sit out in the sun and work on your Problem of God paper or read John Calvin. Although there’s no wifi, the garden is a peaceful place to get work done and escape the masses of stressed out students.

How to get there: if you aren’t feeling the 2 mile walk, you can take the 30S bus up Wisconsin.

2. Kogod Courtyard: 8th St NW & F St NW, Washington, DC 20001

A9R9441.tmp.pdf

What is it: Located inside the National Portrait Gallery/Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard is a cool modern space with lots of tables and free wifi.

Why you should go: If you get tired of studying, you can check out the America’s Presidents gallery or the American Art Museum exhibits (arguably the coolest museum in DC). Bonus: Shake Shack is right across the street.

How to get there: Take the D6 bus to 7th and E, or the Metro red line from Dupont to Gallery Place.

3. The Metro

What is it: This might be a me thing (OK, it’s definitely a me thing), but the Metro is arguably the best study spot in DC.

Why you should go: People-watching is by far the best form of procrastination, and when you’re sick of contemplating the intricacies of macroeconomics, you can contemplate the underground architectural marvel that is the WMATA. Bonus: there’s almost nothing in life as satisfying as riding the Metro to the end of the line, walking across the platform, and getting back on the train going the other way. I also should probably find a hobby other than obsessing over the Metro.

How to get there: If you’re a blue/silver/orange line person, hop on the GUTS bus from Rosslyn and take the Metro from there. If you’re a red line person, take the GUTS bus to Dupont to begin the best study session of your life.

4. Constitution Gardens: 

What is it: Constitution Gardens is another outdoor option for all you lucky people who don’t get sunburned after spending two minutes outside.

Why you should go: Located near the Reflecting Pool but away from all the tourists, Constitution Gardens is a beautiful spot to relax under the shadow of the Washington Monument. Bask in the glory of ‘Merica while cranking out some reading.

How to get there: Constitution Gardens is very close to the Lincoln Memorial, so it’s a doable walk or bike ride. You can also get pretty close using the D6 bus or the Foggy Bottom Metro stop.

5. The Library of Congress: 101 Independence Ave SE, Washington, DC 20540

What is it: The reading room at the Library of Congress is the most legit place to study in the District.

Why you should go: Studying in the hallowed halls of the LoC is a great procrastination preventer as going on Facebook seems sacrilegious when you’re surrounded by actual researchers doing actual research. Bonus: Having a Library of Congress card automatically makes you an ultimate swagmaster and way cooler than all of your friends. Flash that baby at Brown House and you will never again be asked, “Who do you know here?”

How to get there: Both the 30S and the D6 bus will get you within walking distance of the Library. You can also take the Metro from Rosslyn to the Capitol South stop.

Take advantage of all the awesome places DC has to offer, and GTFO during your finals cram sessions. Lau 2 will always be here to welcome you back with open arms and negative productivity.

Photos/Gifs: giphy.com, streetepistemology.com, stationsmart.com, americanart.si.edu, living-in-washingtondc.com, wikipedia.org, blogs.loc.com

Long Weekend Ho! How to Make the Best of a Long Weekend

How To Make The Best Of A Long WeekendLooking forward to a long weekend is similar to counting down the days before Christmas or Hanukkah, or maybe a slightly less significant holiday like St. Patrick’s Day. (Deputy Editor’s note: I highly contest that St. Patrick’s Day is a “less significant holiday,” and I would even move to have it placed with the aforementioned days in terms of degree of importance.) All students have the long weekend circled on their calendar and we all know that that extra day means everything during midterm season.

success-baby-long-weekend-aww-yeaaWith many years of school under our belts, we students like to think we know how to approach the long weekend: another night to go out, another morning to sleep in and maybe (only for the truly ambitious or the truly swamped in work) some extra study time. But the three day weekend can zoom by as fast as Netflix marathons on a lazy afternoon, so it can be useful to come in with a strategy or a set of goals. With Columbus Day weekend upon us, here are some tips on how to make the best of the next three days:

1. Take the opportunity to explore D.C. For new and veteran students alike, the long weekend is a great chance to get out of your rooms and off campus. Walk to a new restaurant so you can work off the meal afterward or visit a museum. Don’t let the shutdown get you down; the Smithsonian is still pretty cool looking in from the outside, and the Newseum is still open.

2. Don’t listen to Nas; sleep is not the cousin of death, at least for overworked students The long weekend is exciting, but don’t be afraid to sacrifice time hanging out with your buddies to remedy the all-nighters you pulled this week for those three midterms and two papers. You’ll have sweet dreams of A’s and A+’s with frosting on top.

3. The long weekend is as much of your friend as it is an enemy Friday will trick you into thinking you’ve got an eternity to do what you want with your free time. Saturday will say, “Hey, homework is for Sundays, but don’t forget football,” and Monday morning will quickly turn into the annoying “I told you so” when you haven’t studied, done your laundry or cleaned your room.

4. Do. Your. Laundry. We know you’re wearing the same socks that you wore yesterday because midterms have kept you from getting your laundry done. This long weekend is a great chance to expand your wardrobe back to its proper size.

5. Finally, in the spirit of the holiday, make your Columbus Day and long weekend worthwhile Find the balance between studying and going out, between eating and exercise and between college football and the NFL. Toast friends, family and fall, and raise your glasses to the long weekend.

Photos: Vacation-Lovers, Rungitom