The Best (and Worst) of Super Bowl Ads

by Martin Hussey

Last night marked my second favorite American holiday (behind Thanksgiving). After all, when else do people crowd around the TV, watch some football, stuff their faces with junk food and cheer at advertisements? And despite a matchup that did not feature my Denver Broncos, this Super Bowl turned out to be one of my favorites. For one, it was exciting until Tom Brady’s very last Hail Mary. It also featured the best halftime show I can remember (certainly better than The Black Eyed Peas’ disaster in Dallas last year). More than anything, though, this year’s ads topped even those of last year.

While no single ad was better than Chrysler’s epic inspirational 2-minute commercial last year (although Chrysler did show another, slightly depressing and less exciting 2-minute ad during halftime this year) the group of commercials in Super Bowl XLVI was, as a whole, more hilarious, more inspirational, and more entertaining than before. In case you missed the ads, here’s my rundown of the best and worst ads from last night:

BEST:

Dannon’s Oikos Greek Yogurt: When this first came on, I was furious that Dannon wasted a Super Bowl spot on an ad featuring John Stamos playing with yogurt (boring!) but the ending is priceless.

 

Chevy Sonic: It is really amazing how Chevy can make a subcompact car seem completely awesome just by dumping it out of a plane, making it do skateboard tricks, and putting it on a bungee jump. The song choice just brings the whole thing together. Great ad.

 

Doritos: Babies flying through the air and stealing Doritos away from a mean big kid is funny. Doritos wins the award for best use of juvenile humor this year.

Continue reading “The Best (and Worst) of Super Bowl Ads”

Sunday Night Wrapup: The End of Occupy?

by Michelle Cassidy

Photo: Flickr user Glyn Lowe Photos

Between a Hoya victory, evacuations in McPherson Square and a last-minute win for the New York Giants, this was a decidedly exciting weekend. Despite our brief hiatus last week, we’re back with the highlights in this weekend’s Sunday Night Wrapup:

  • Saturday’s game against South Florida ended in a big win for the Hoyas. If we keep up this level of play, Syracuse should probably start worrying about our matchup on Wednesday night.
  • Park Police raided the Occupy D.C. encampments in McPherson Square early Saturday morning and started clearing out campers and tents. Though the raid was relatively calm compared to those in Oakland and New York City, at least eight people were arrested as of Saturday night.
  • Sunday night you could hear the whoops of New Yorkers (and the gloomy faces of New Englanders) across campus after the Giants took home another Superbowl victory. Looks like Manning Face will be going to Disney World!

Best Bets: Improv and Indie

by Kyle Short

FRIDAY

DC Improv (1140 Connecticut Ave NW, near DuPont Circle) is hosting Bert Kreisher, who has been featured on Comedy Central’s Last Comic Standing 2 and has his own show on the Travel Channel called Bert the Conqueror. If that doesn’t impress you, Kreisher has admitted that the movie Van Wilder is loosely based on his college career at Florida Sate. Rolling Stone, in an article entitled The Undergraduate, named him the top partier at the University, which was ranked the number one party school in the nation in 1997. He’s performing both Friday and Saturday Nights.

SATURDAY

If stand up comedy isn’t your speed, go check out the Classixx’s at U Street Music Hall (1115 U St NW), accessible off the yellow line.  This L.A. based indie band has a cool edgy sound and I’ve never had a bad night on U Street, so it should be a good time and give you a break from Georgetown. It’s a really cool spot, but don’t let the long, ominous stairs fool you, it’s quite spacious with a great dance floor, and is a great opportunity to mingle with other D.C. students. I wouldn’t be surprised if you rubbed shoulders with students from American, GW, or even Howard. It’s 18 and up, with a $10 cover at the door.

SUNDAY

Even if you don’t like football, don’t know the difference between a tight end and a quarterback or don’t care about fully grown men hashing it out on a field of battle, you should still watch the Super Bowl (this is America after all).  For upperclassmen who are 21+ I would suggest Rhino, which is a New England bar (that’s you Patriots fans) or the 51st State, which last time I checked was a New York bar (Giants). For those of you who aren’t 21, I’d suggest cozying up to some of your upperclassmen friends for a super bowl party, or seeing if your floor is having a party in the common room. Either way, football is the word of the day.

Friday Fixat10ns: Magic in the Air

by Martin Hussey

FIXAT10NS: Magic in the Air from thehoya on 8tracks.

Some sort of magic has definitely been in the floating around campus this week, with temperatures soaring into the 70s on Wednesday, Georgetown’s walloping of UConn on Wednesday night and that yearly affair with the groundhog (where some strange form of groundhog magic predicted six more weeks of winter Thursday morning). To commemorate this excellent week in Hoya history, we’re starting the weekend off on a magical note as well, with 10 magical tunes designed to charm you  into relaxation.

Harry Potter and the Half-Dub Remix — Terabyte Frenzy The dubstep craze is remixing everything from Rebecca Black’s “Friday” to soundbytes from Family Guy. This is one of the few remixes that this grandma should have been dancing to.

Magic Spells — Crystal Castles The magical thing about this song is how they make a repetitive beat and no words still sound interesting after six minutes. Finger drumming is inevitable.

Love Sex Magic — Ciara (feat. Justin Timberlake) This 2009 dance anthem reminds me of junior prom. To some, that night was magical in itself. I find myself wondering, though, whether our DJ realized he was playing this song to a bunch of hormonal high schoolers.

The Ghost Inside — Broken Bells Ghosts are magical, right? Regardless, this is a great song, and the chorus is hypnotizingly entrancing.

Golden Age – TV on the Radio We’re in the age of miracles – we must be when it is 70 degrees on the first day of February.

Time to Pretend — MGMT A lot of you may have fallen out of touch with this song. Don’t. Plus, I feel like this song is increasingly relevant in my life as I near the time in my life where I “get jobs in offices and wake up for the morning news.”

Magic — Pilot Who can’t include this song in a list of magical music? This cheesy 70’s rocker still maintains an infectious chorus that populates the best moments in movies, TV shows and plays as in my head when awesome things happen to me.

Ghost! – Kid Cudi I couldn’t resist including Kid Cudi in this song, with his strange story lines about men on the moon and other such fantastical things. This song was also great in concert: Here’s a clip from the performance I saw live.

Do You Believe in Magic? – The Lovin’ Spoonful The second oldie about magic on this post. If you’re bored by the classic, I recommend the Aly and AJ version from the Disney show Wizards of Waverly Place.

I Believe – Simian Mobile Disco I believe in magic. Actually, I don’t. But some people do. If you believe in anything, it should be this song, with its weird beat that frames a pretty legit song.

Georgetown Metro Headaches

by Martin Hussey

As if Georgetown didn’t have enough transportation problems, the main conduit for off-campus transportation, the Rosslyn metro station, will be closed for track work this weekend, according to a WMATA press release. The authority will replace trains with free buses between the closed station, but warns Orange and Blue Line riders that delays could reach 20-30 minutes through the construction zone.

Since a trip to Rosslyn from campus already can take up to 20 minutes, try alternate bus routes, particularly the 38B, 32/36, G2, D6 and Circulator.

For the all-important basketball game against South Florida at 11 a.m. on Saturday morning, special game day buses will run between Dupont Circle and the parking lot in front of McDonough, according to an e-mail sent to season ticket holders Thursday. Careful, though, the south entrance to the Dupont metro stop is also closed due to escalator repair.

According to WMATA, the station closure will allow workers to replace rail fasteners and remove sludge in the tunnel under the Potomac River. The rail closures are all part of a $5 billion project over five years to fix aging rail lines that can lead to problems like cracked rails, which have been found in recent weeks at Rosslyn and Tenleytown, causing delays to commuters.

D.C. Ramblings: Foggy Bottom

by Kyle Short

Its been so warm this week that I decided to go and explore some more of the city. I like to claim that I know a lot about D.C., but on this latest excursion, I actually stumbled upon a hidden jewel in Foggy Bottom. West End Cinema, located on 23rd Street, off of M Street, is a newly opened and renovated theater that offers independent and foreign films as well as documentaries, establishing itself as D.C.’s newest “art house.” For those movie buffs out there lamenting D.C.’s lack of independent film offerings, West End Cinema is sure to present something different from the AMC on Water St.

Instead of staying on M Street when it forks, walk down Pennsylvania Avenue until the circle where you can find McFadden’s, your best bet for a good time on a Tuesday night. It can be a little cramped when crowded, but for you ladies, it may be one of the few opportunities you’ll get to dance on a bar, (if that’s the kind of thing you’re into). You can also sign up for a happy hour, where if you’re selected, you drink for free and all your friends get reduced priced drinks.

Continue reading “D.C. Ramblings: Foggy Bottom”

Housing at a Glance: Picking the Perfect Housing

With housing selection for freshmen fast approaching, there are lots of things to consider. Besides trying to find someone you are willing to live with for an entire year, you also have to consider which housing option to select. While everyone dreams of living in a Georgetown townhouse and leaving behind the days of awkward towel-covered and  flip-flop walks to/from the bathroom, there is something standing in the way: housing lottery numbers. Since there is no way to know what housing number will arrive in the inbox, it’s best to get your hopes up too high. Freshmen lucky enough to get relatively low numbers have decent chances of avoiding a communal bathrooms; with the majority of first-years, dorm life continues. For those confused about their options, take a look at our compilation of Hilltop housing.

Photo: alumni.georgetown.edu

Continue reading “Housing at a Glance: Picking the Perfect Housing”

We’re #1!

by Michelle Cassidy

Alas, we’re not talking about the basketball team (they’re still holding out at 14 in the AP and Coaches’ polls). D.C. released its annual financial report this past Monday and Georgetown topped the list of principal employers in the District of Columbia, according to NBC Washington.

We came in first, followed by GW, Washington Hospital Center, Children’s National Medical Center and Georgetown University Hospital.

 

John Legend Wants to Know What’s Going On

by Michelle Cassidy

The Kennedy Center announced on Tuesday plans for a new youth engagement project. According to TBD, the most captivating part of the event was when a choir from our neighbors up at Duke Ellington  School of the Arts came onstage to sing with John Legend.

Earlier in the day the singer had surprised the students by joining them during rehearsal. During the press event, he invited the choir to come up for a performance of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On.”

Legend is highly involved in this new project, dubbed the What’s Going On… NOW Campaign. The main event will be a concert featuring Legend and the National Symphony Orchestra Pops on the 40th anniversary of Gaye’s performance at the Kennedy Center.  Their goal is to lead a “national conversation around the issues and ideas on the record,” and ask young people to respond to Gaye’s question in their own artistic way.

The campaign invites people to submit their artistic responses – selected pieces will be incorporated into the May 1st concert. Submissions can be in any medium (writing, spoken word poetry, song, dance, sculpture, etc.) as long as they creatively respond to the topic at hand. They even provide some inspiration if you’re thinking about entering, but having trouble coming up with an idea.