D.C. Ramblings: Foggy Bottom

by Kyle Short

Its been so warm this week that I decided to go and explore some more of the city. I like to claim that I know a lot about D.C., but on this latest excursion, I actually stumbled upon a hidden jewel in Foggy Bottom. West End Cinema, located on 23rd Street, off of M Street, is a newly opened and renovated theater that offers independent and foreign films as well as documentaries, establishing itself as D.C.’s newest “art house.” For those movie buffs out there lamenting D.C.’s lack of independent film offerings, West End Cinema is sure to present something different from the AMC on Water St.

Instead of staying on M Street when it forks, walk down Pennsylvania Avenue until the circle where you can find McFadden’s, your best bet for a good time on a Tuesday night. It can be a little cramped when crowded, but for you ladies, it may be one of the few opportunities you’ll get to dance on a bar, (if that’s the kind of thing you’re into). You can also sign up for a happy hour, where if you’re selected, you drink for free and all your friends get reduced priced drinks.

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Housing at a Glance: Picking the Perfect Housing

With housing selection for freshmen fast approaching, there are lots of things to consider. Besides trying to find someone you are willing to live with for an entire year, you also have to consider which housing option to select. While everyone dreams of living in a Georgetown townhouse and leaving behind the days of awkward towel-covered and  flip-flop walks to/from the bathroom, there is something standing in the way: housing lottery numbers. Since there is no way to know what housing number will arrive in the inbox, it’s best to get your hopes up too high. Freshmen lucky enough to get relatively low numbers have decent chances of avoiding a communal bathrooms; with the majority of first-years, dorm life continues. For those confused about their options, take a look at our compilation of Hilltop housing.

Photo: alumni.georgetown.edu

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We’re #1!

by Michelle Cassidy

Alas, we’re not talking about the basketball team (they’re still holding out at 14 in the AP and Coaches’ polls). D.C. released its annual financial report this past Monday and Georgetown topped the list of principal employers in the District of Columbia, according to NBC Washington.

We came in first, followed by GW, Washington Hospital Center, Children’s National Medical Center and Georgetown University Hospital.

 

John Legend Wants to Know What’s Going On

by Michelle Cassidy

The Kennedy Center announced on Tuesday plans for a new youth engagement project. According to TBD, the most captivating part of the event was when a choir from our neighbors up at Duke Ellington  School of the Arts came onstage to sing with John Legend.

Earlier in the day the singer had surprised the students by joining them during rehearsal. During the press event, he invited the choir to come up for a performance of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On.”

Legend is highly involved in this new project, dubbed the What’s Going On… NOW Campaign. The main event will be a concert featuring Legend and the National Symphony Orchestra Pops on the 40th anniversary of Gaye’s performance at the Kennedy Center.  Their goal is to lead a “national conversation around the issues and ideas on the record,” and ask young people to respond to Gaye’s question in their own artistic way.

The campaign invites people to submit their artistic responses – selected pieces will be incorporated into the May 1st concert. Submissions can be in any medium (writing, spoken word poetry, song, dance, sculpture, etc.) as long as they creatively respond to the topic at hand. They even provide some inspiration if you’re thinking about entering, but having trouble coming up with an idea.

Staffer of the Week: Michael Grasso

Photo: Michelle Cassidy/The Hoya

Once a week, The Hoya recognizes a staffer that has done a particularly awesome job – now you get to know about them too! As part of our Leavey 421 series, we’ll be posting quick interviews with each Staffer of the Week on Tuesday nights.

Name: Michael Grasso
Position on The Hoya: Director of Personnel
School: SFS
Year: 2014
Major: Regional Comparative Studies
Hometown: New YorkWestchester, NY
How did you earn Staffer of the Week?
Reworking and managing our application process (Ed note: like a pro!).

What’s your spirit animal? Why?
“Well, I think birds are cool because then I wouldn’t have to pay for airfare.”

If you could be any vegetable, which vegetable would you be?
“I’d like to be an eggplant. Purple is awesome.”

Leavey 421 is a recurring series that goes behind the scenes of The Hoya to bring you the most interesting, exciting and peculiar bits of the lives of Hoya staffers. If you want to learn more about joining The Hoya, please contact us.

Campus Sartorialist: January

by Michelle Cassidy

It’s hard to ignore the well-dressed members of Georgetown’s community. They have majorly different styles, from classic Ralph Lauren to thrift store chic, with just a bit of everything else in between. Today we’re introducing the first in a series called Campus Sartorialist, in which we’ll be hunting out the best of campus fashion.

Annie Jacoby (COL ’13) flawlessly mixes knits and leather to create a chic winter ensemble.

 

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Leo’s Gourmet: Healthy Breakfast

by Martin Hussey

College students tend to make some unhealthy decisions. At this stage in our life we can absorb most of these poor dietary choices. Had too much to drink last night? Your metabolism can handle it so quickly that you only feel the effects for a few hours. Chicken Finger Thursday? No big deal for these 18-23 year-old digestive systems. Missed Yates for a couple of weeks? Odds are you haven’t put on any noticeable weight. As young people, we can usually get away with unhealthy choices. But, sooner or later, our poor health decisions will catch up to us.

But the unhealthy effects of a poor breakfast — or the lack of a breakfast — can negatively impact your health (and your day). And with the wonderful selection of sugary cereals, greasy meats and starchy bagels at Leo’s it can be difficult to make yourself a healthy and nutritious breakfast. Luckily, we’ve got you covered for the ideal balanced breakfast to get you started on your day, while still fitting into your meal plan.

Step 1: Yogurt parfait Grab some yogurt — no more than a couple of spoonfulls (Leo’s yogurt is more fattening than the more trendy Chobani variety). Head over to the cereal station and add in some Raisin Bran, Special K with Red Berries, Heart-to-Heart, or Chex (Avoid the sweeter cereals, and instead sweeten with honey.) Top off with slices of melon or banana.

Step 2: Breakfast sandwich Get an egg white at the omelet station. Grab one slice of wheat bread and toast it. Sparingly add hot sauce to the top.

Step 3: Fruit Grab a grapefruit half – resist the urge to add sugar!

Step 4: Wake-up beverage As a caffeine-free guy, I don’t necessarily understand the urge to wake up with a piping hot cup of coffee. But for those of you who need the jolt of piping hot caffeine, avoid adding too much sugar or creamer. If anything, keep the coffee additive to a bit of skim milk. If you really can’t stand the taste of coffee, switch to tea.

See if you can switch up your Leo’s routine and start your day off just a bit healthier than usual.

City Paper Answers All of Your Questions

by Michelle Cassidy

This week, the Washington City Paper pulled a particularly ambitious stunt when they attempted to answer the “most nagging questions about life in the District.” Well color us impressed, because they’ve done a fairly thorough job that’s definitely worth checking out. In their Answers Issue, they address 32 pressing questions posed by District residents.

In October, City Paper asked its readers to submit their questions, and they’ve picked the most intriguing ones to feature in the Answers Issue. With topics ranging from the native fruits and vegetables of the D.C. area to the lack of J, X and Y streets in the city, this article answers questions that we wouldn’t have even thought to ask. It’s an informative and helpful read that 4E wholeheartedly recommends taking a look at.

Though it functions partially as a magic eight ball (“Will Mayor Vince Gray get re-elected?”), the City Paper does showcase some interesting bits of D.C. history and culture. It’s a veritable encyclopedia of modern D.C. life. I mean, where else could you learn about the political power of local taxi drivers?

All Yellow Taxis in D.C.?

by Martin Hussey

Caitlin McGrath/The Hoya

D.C. may be on the verge of major changes to its taxi infrastructure. The city will soon increase fares, as The Hoya reported last month, and new regulations may force taxi drivers to improve service to less-traveled areas of the District. But a more noticeable plan may force standardization of D.C.’s taxicab livery.

Councilmember Mary Cheh, the same D.C. councilor responsible for taxi reform and for purportedly exporting the District’s rats to Maryland and Virginia, set up an online survey to test public sentiment on what the city’s taxi colors should be. Among the more than 4,000 respondents, 38 percent favored standardized yellow cabs. The city, for its part, seems to support the idea of making all taxis the same color. Cheh’s survey simply asks people to vote for their favorite color.

One of the most unique things about Washington has to be the city’s colorful taxicabs. At any given moment, people hoping to catch a cab can step into any array of colorful taxis — green, silver, white, black, blue, red, and even pink. All of the hype over taxi reform, though, begs the question: Are D.C.’s different taxi liveries one of the city’s signatures? Or should the city now standardize the livery like that of New York?

My take on it — let’s keep the taxis all different colors. I love it when I flag down a purple or maroon cab. But if we want to be boring like New York and make all our cabs yellow and expensive, that is no loss to me. I take the bus anyway.