Metro+ Changes: Coming Tomorrow

Tomorrow, Metro riders are about to see the culmination of a project more than a year in the making that aims to improve rush hour service across the Metrorail system. Rush+, as WMATA has termed it, will add trains in overcrowded segments of the Metro system to alleviate crowding, especially on the Orange Line from Downtown D.C. to Northern Virginia through Rosslyn.

To help riders with the upcoming changes, WMATA has put together a handy-dandy website with a clickable Metro map to discuss the upcoming changes to the system. The changes include:

  • Three additional Orange Line trains in each direction during rush hour, but each of the new trains will run between Vienna and Largo Town Center, not New Carrollton (as most Orange Line trains do).
  • Three fewer Blue Line trains in each direction during rush hour, but the three lost trains will be rerouted onto the Yellow Line, so riders from Pentagon south won’t see any decrease in service. Also, keep in mind the three additional Orange Line trains running to Largo. In all, only one station will see a decrease in service — Arlington Cemetery.
  • Three additional Yellow Line trains in each direction during rush hout, but those trains will run from Franconia-Springfield (replacing lost Blue Line service) to Greenbelt.

All in all, Orange Line stations in Northern Virginia and Green/Yellow Line stations in D.C. will see increased rush hour service. Only Arlington Cemetery station will see decreased service, and all other stations retain their normal service during rush hour (including Dupont and Rosslyn).

For Georgetown students, whose stations won’t see any new service, the biggest change to the Metro system will be with updated signage and snazzy new Metro maps (which are already installed in the trains).

Friday Fixat10ns: Internship Edition

Friday Fixat10ns: Internships from thehoya on 8tracks.

Those of us lucky to have summer internships have now probably just started to get into our routines. The cobwebs and mistakes of our  first weeks are over, and now we’re in the thick of it. For those of you already tired of the daily commutes, long hours and cubicles, this playlist is for you. Here, we have ten songs perfect for any summer intern — whether you’re in D.C. or across the country.

Ballad of a Politician — Regina Spektor One of the best songs on Regina’s newly released album, this song is for those of you working on the Hill or in any otherwise political job this summer. (As in, most of us in D.C.)

212 — Azealia Banks This is for you New York interns out there. (Also, Azealia Banks is only 21.)

Cruel — St. Vincent Many of us will inevitably meet cruel bosses, coworkers and (most often) fellow interns. This song will help you get over them.

Midnight City — M83 I know that I already posted this song (or a mashup of it) on the last edition of Fixat10ns. But, honestly, this is the perfect intern song for anyone in the city. Listen to this song on the Metro in the morning. It sets a good mood for the rest of the day.

Money Maker — The Black Keys Most of us aren’t money makers this summer. Hopefully our internships lead us to become money makers, though.

Civilian — Wye Oak If you’re ever stressed, listen to this song. It’ll calm you down. They’re also visiting D.C. this August 17.

Society — Eddie Vedder Another great commuting song. Also especially relevant to interns due to us now being functioning members of society instead of holed up on a college campus.

Civilization — Justice Awesome dance beat for your commute home or a quick office break.

Hum Drum Town — Theophilus London I feel like this song is somehow relevant to internships. Though D.C. is not a humdrum (AKA boring) town in the slightest, and Theophilus is most certainly not making a profound observation about society or working people. In any case, it’s a great song.

Chillin — Wale feat. Lady Gaga I always feel obliged to include one song on Fixat10ns. Since many of us are D.C. chillin, this is a shout out to everyone who stayed in the District this summer.

Casual Thursday: Three Cheers for the Red, White and Blue

Today is my second favorite holiday of the year, and it’s also Thursday. You know what that means? A very special Flag Day edition of Casual Thursday!

I know what you’re thinking – Flag Day is super lame. Wrong! Flag Day is like a mini 4th of July—fewer fireworks, less day drinking, but just as much excitement about the American flag. But just because we didn’t get off work today doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate with drink that has some unnatural blue food coloring.

This patriotic margarita from Coastal Living has all the requisite colors for a Flag Day party.

It also features Hypnotiq, which according to Wikipedia, was created by a college dropout living with his parents on Long Island after he saw a bright blue perfume at Bloomingdale’s and wanted to create a liqueur of the same hue. If you’ve never had it before, it tastes like the color blue.

Ingredients:
Frozen strawberries
Dark Rum
Coconut Milk
Pineapple Juice
Lime Juice
Ice
Hypnotiq

 

 

1. Puree thawed frozen strawberries.

2. Blend 2 tablespoons each of the strawberry puree, dark rum, coconut milk, pineapple juice, fresh lime juice, and ½ cup crushed ice in a blender until smooth.

3. Pour 2 to 4 tablespoons Hypnotiq into a glass, and top with 2 to 4 tablespoons of the strawberry mixture.

And what better way to relax, celebrate Flag Day and be a little nostalgic than to watch some classic Nickelodeon: Salute Your Shorts. Camp Anawanna always welcomes you. You can find episodes from the first season on iTunes and Amazon.

Stay casual, Hoyas.

Photos: costalliving.com, ioffer.com

Summer InternTips: Gaining Respect

You’ve spent a couple of weeks at your internship now, and now that you’ve avoided most of the first week pitfalls, you’re ready to get more exciting assignments and take full advantage of your internship experience. Last week, we here at 4E gave you some tips to make your first week awesome. Now, we’ll give you the tips you need to gain respect at the workplace.

1. Volunteer for things. Most internships are composed of primarily tasks fulltime staff members don’t want to or don’t have time ro perform themselves. So, they’ll often ask for assistance on less exciting or less important projects that still need to be done. Especially if you’re in an office with other interns or if you have extra time on your hands, volunteering for extra projects is the best way to get noticed.

2. Don’t be shy. One of the best ways to get to know your coworkers is by meeting them in the hallways, in the break room, at lunch or when you walk by their office. Instead of customarily nodding or waving at them, introduce yourself politely. A lot of interns fall into the pitfall of being “the intern” that no one knows, so get people to know your name as opposed to your title.

3. Don’t slack off. If you have a project, get straight to work. If you don’t have a project, ask for one quickly. Most interns aren’t well known in their offices because they don’t do a lot of work. They sit around dillydallying on Facebook, ESPN, Twitter or Pinterest as opposed to asking for other work. If you really don’t have anything to do, read the news or other relevant materials to your internship (like company reports, etc.).

4. Know your work as well as everyone else does. The hardest part about interning somewhere for one summer is familiarizing yourself with your employer and your employer’s work. Still, you work there, and you should try to get to know the issues as well as everyone else in your office. This means reading industry news websites, following similar organizations’ work and asking around the office to figure out what specific people are working on.

5. Show off (but not too much). Don’t be afraid to showcase you knowledge, your skill set and your Georgetown education. Just don’t make a big deal of it. Everyone else at the office will start to hate you if you do. But, if you can show your skills in a humble way, you’ll score major points with the office.

6. Learn names. Try to learn you coworkers’ names, and address them by name. It gives them an incentive to address you by name, as well.

7. Take notes and ask questions so that your work will be the best it can be. When you get an assignment, make sure that you know how to do it before you start. That way, you’ll turn out better work and you’ll start to earn respect in the workplace. The best way to earn respect at work is by doing something that deserves respect.

Photo credit: cybermonsters.blogspot.com

Casual Thursday: The Hot Winds are Rising

If you’re a huge Game of Thrones fan, you’ve probably spent the last few days since Sunday’s season finale mumbling about dragons and Whitewalkers and how stupid of a name Joffrey is. Anybody? Is that just me? If you’re not a huge Game of Thrones fan, you probably think I’m insane.

But regardless, the season is over. Lucky for us, we’re at the start of summer instead of the Long Winter. Temperatures are climbing and air conditioning is expensive, so why not sit down with a cold drink while you consider who really deserves the Iron Throne?

Continue reading “Casual Thursday: The Hot Winds are Rising”

Summer InternTips: Your First Week

If you’re like me, you just finished your third day of your summer internship. You’re learning the ropes at your new job, and you’re just starting to get to know your boss, secretary and office mates. But you’re still learning the ropes. You still have to check in at the front desk as a visitor because your badge hasn’t been made yet. You’re still eating lunch alone in your office. You arrive five minutes later than you’re supposed to because you missed your bus stop. (Note: these all apply to me. It’s OK.)

Because here at 4E we know that you’re probably in the same boat, we compiled some tips for how to make your first week as productive to your internship as possible:

1. Get to know your office. Explore all of the possibilities your company, building, and neighborhood have to offer. A lot of buildings (especially on Capitol Hill) have special perks to like food courts, cafes, ice cream or fro-yo, or fancy vending machines. Some offices have green roofs for lunch breaks so you don’t have to eat in your office.

2. Learn the ropes of your work. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. This is your first week — bosses expect questions, and always prefer them to incomplete or shoddy work. Now is the time to figure out how best to finish assignments so that you can do them consistently correctly for the rest of your internship.

3. Meet your coworkers, even the ones you won’t end up working with consistently. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to everyone. Basically, you don’t want to be the intern that no one knows the name of come July. Plus, think networking.

4. Start off on a good foot. Though you should expect to make some mistakes, be prompt, polite, and make an effort. Your bosses will expect mistakes as well, but they’ll be watching your work ethic and demeanor this week. Even if you make mistakes, making a good effort this week will help you secure more interesting and important projects later in your internship.

5. Save your money. Unpaid and paid interns alike, we all have thin wallets. So save your money by making your lunch ahead of time and bringing it to work, taking the bus ($1.50) instead of the Metro (with an upcoming price increase in July) or a cab.

6. Stay positive. Even if your week is rough (many of ours will be), the rest of the summer won’t be. Believe in yourself and your ability to learn how to do your job, meet other interns and network with your coworkers. The first week is tough for everybody. Almost certainly, next week will be better.

7. Link in with the greater D.C. intern community. D.C. in the summer is an exciting place with tons of other college students visiting us for the summer. Even though we here at Georgetown are blessed with a hefty set of connections in D.C., it is always a good idea to meet kids from other colleges at other internships. There are plenty of blogs, Twitter feeds and Facebook pages dedicated to summer interns here. Most are only relevant to those who don’t have the privilege of living in D.C. during the school year, but they’re still good resources for anyone on the Hilltop with an internship.

Image credit: Vanity Fair