Staffer of the Week: Michael Grasso

Photo: Michelle Cassidy/The Hoya

Once a week, The Hoya recognizes a staffer that has done a particularly awesome job – now you get to know about them too! As part of our Leavey 421 series, we’ll be posting quick interviews with each Staffer of the Week on Tuesday nights.

Name: Michael Grasso
Position on The Hoya: Director of Personnel
School: SFS
Year: 2014
Major: Regional Comparative Studies
Hometown: New YorkWestchester, NY
How did you earn Staffer of the Week?
Reworking and managing our application process (Ed note: like a pro!).

What’s your spirit animal? Why?
“Well, I think birds are cool because then I wouldn’t have to pay for airfare.”

If you could be any vegetable, which vegetable would you be?
“I’d like to be an eggplant. Purple is awesome.”

Leavey 421 is a recurring series that goes behind the scenes of The Hoya to bring you the most interesting, exciting and peculiar bits of the lives of Hoya staffers. If you want to learn more about joining The Hoya, please contact us.

Campus Sartorialist: January

by Michelle Cassidy

It’s hard to ignore the well-dressed members of Georgetown’s community. They have majorly different styles, from classic Ralph Lauren to thrift store chic, with just a bit of everything else in between. Today we’re introducing the first in a series called Campus Sartorialist, in which we’ll be hunting out the best of campus fashion.

Annie Jacoby (COL ’13) flawlessly mixes knits and leather to create a chic winter ensemble.

 

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Leo’s Gourmet: Healthy Breakfast

by Martin Hussey

College students tend to make some unhealthy decisions. At this stage in our life we can absorb most of these poor dietary choices. Had too much to drink last night? Your metabolism can handle it so quickly that you only feel the effects for a few hours. Chicken Finger Thursday? No big deal for these 18-23 year-old digestive systems. Missed Yates for a couple of weeks? Odds are you haven’t put on any noticeable weight. As young people, we can usually get away with unhealthy choices. But, sooner or later, our poor health decisions will catch up to us.

But the unhealthy effects of a poor breakfast — or the lack of a breakfast — can negatively impact your health (and your day). And with the wonderful selection of sugary cereals, greasy meats and starchy bagels at Leo’s it can be difficult to make yourself a healthy and nutritious breakfast. Luckily, we’ve got you covered for the ideal balanced breakfast to get you started on your day, while still fitting into your meal plan.

Step 1: Yogurt parfait Grab some yogurt — no more than a couple of spoonfulls (Leo’s yogurt is more fattening than the more trendy Chobani variety). Head over to the cereal station and add in some Raisin Bran, Special K with Red Berries, Heart-to-Heart, or Chex (Avoid the sweeter cereals, and instead sweeten with honey.) Top off with slices of melon or banana.

Step 2: Breakfast sandwich Get an egg white at the omelet station. Grab one slice of wheat bread and toast it. Sparingly add hot sauce to the top.

Step 3: Fruit Grab a grapefruit half – resist the urge to add sugar!

Step 4: Wake-up beverage As a caffeine-free guy, I don’t necessarily understand the urge to wake up with a piping hot cup of coffee. But for those of you who need the jolt of piping hot caffeine, avoid adding too much sugar or creamer. If anything, keep the coffee additive to a bit of skim milk. If you really can’t stand the taste of coffee, switch to tea.

See if you can switch up your Leo’s routine and start your day off just a bit healthier than usual.

City Paper Answers All of Your Questions

by Michelle Cassidy

This week, the Washington City Paper pulled a particularly ambitious stunt when they attempted to answer the “most nagging questions about life in the District.” Well color us impressed, because they’ve done a fairly thorough job that’s definitely worth checking out. In their Answers Issue, they address 32 pressing questions posed by District residents.

In October, City Paper asked its readers to submit their questions, and they’ve picked the most intriguing ones to feature in the Answers Issue. With topics ranging from the native fruits and vegetables of the D.C. area to the lack of J, X and Y streets in the city, this article answers questions that we wouldn’t have even thought to ask. It’s an informative and helpful read that 4E wholeheartedly recommends taking a look at.

Though it functions partially as a magic eight ball (“Will Mayor Vince Gray get re-elected?”), the City Paper does showcase some interesting bits of D.C. history and culture. It’s a veritable encyclopedia of modern D.C. life. I mean, where else could you learn about the political power of local taxi drivers?

All Yellow Taxis in D.C.?

by Martin Hussey

Caitlin McGrath/The Hoya

D.C. may be on the verge of major changes to its taxi infrastructure. The city will soon increase fares, as The Hoya reported last month, and new regulations may force taxi drivers to improve service to less-traveled areas of the District. But a more noticeable plan may force standardization of D.C.’s taxicab livery.

Councilmember Mary Cheh, the same D.C. councilor responsible for taxi reform and for purportedly exporting the District’s rats to Maryland and Virginia, set up an online survey to test public sentiment on what the city’s taxi colors should be. Among the more than 4,000 respondents, 38 percent favored standardized yellow cabs. The city, for its part, seems to support the idea of making all taxis the same color. Cheh’s survey simply asks people to vote for their favorite color.

One of the most unique things about Washington has to be the city’s colorful taxicabs. At any given moment, people hoping to catch a cab can step into any array of colorful taxis — green, silver, white, black, blue, red, and even pink. All of the hype over taxi reform, though, begs the question: Are D.C.’s different taxi liveries one of the city’s signatures? Or should the city now standardize the livery like that of New York?

My take on it — let’s keep the taxis all different colors. I love it when I flag down a purple or maroon cab. But if we want to be boring like New York and make all our cabs yellow and expensive, that is no loss to me. I take the bus anyway.

 

Best Bets: Dim Sum for All

by Beth Garbitelli

FRIDAY

Take a break from the standard Top 40 jams played at most Georgetown establishments and mix it up at An Evening of Mashups at the Black Cat (1811 14th Street, NW). They promise remixes and  Girl Talk-esque tracks. Tickets are a measly  5 bucks which is about the same as cover for Modern or Thirds. Tickets will be sold at the door.

SATURDAY

Check out a midnight screening of It Happened One Night at the E Street Cinema (555 11th Street, NW). Directed by Frank Capra (who also made It’s A Wonderful Life) this classic screwball comedy has won over hearts for years and betchya it’s more charming and innovative than a certain black and white film that’s been getting a ton of Oscar attention this season. Watch a snippet here.

SUNDAY

Gather up your pals and head over to Chinatown (6th and I Streets, NW) to celebrate, albeit belatedly, the Chinese New Year. Start by getting some dim sum here  or here or here and then stick around for the Parade ( at 2:00 p.m.) that will be complete with dragon floats, traditional music and dancing. It’s the Year of the Dragon, folks. Not sure what the astrological significance of that is but hey, it sounds pretty cool, right? I think it means take any excuse to eat dim sum.

 

Friday Fixat10ns: Stand Up

by Michelle Cassidy

Between the first anniversary of the uprisings in Egypt and a lunchtime demonstration in Leo’s, it’s been a tumultuous few days both on campus and throughout the world. In the spirit of this omnipresent change, this week’s Friday Fixat10ns is filled with songs about protest, revolution, freedom and change. After the jump, a list of the songs and why they made the cut on this week’s playlist.

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Leavey 421: Best of the Wall

by Michelle Cassidy

Slideshow:
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Getting the paper printed isn’t an easy job, and it takes lots of coordination to reach our printer’s deadline. This often means that Hoya staffers are camped out in our office  until the wee hours of the morning. When you start to spend an excessive amount of time with the same group of people, you start to hear some weird things. It’s tradition in our office that particularly memorable moments are recorded and posted up on the wall (some quotes have been up for more than 10 years!). We’ve uploaded a few of our favorites, but if you want to see the rest you’re just going to have to come visit.

Leavey 421 is a recurring series that goes behind the scenes of The Hoya to bring you the most interesting, exciting and peculiar bits of the lives of Hoya staffers. If you want to learn more about joining The Hoya, please contact us.

Housing At a Glance: Finding the Perfect Roommate

By Martin Hussey

With freshman housing selection just a few weeks away, it seems like the entire class of 2015 is on pins and needles with roommate drama. The coming weeks will inevitably be filled with jostling for the few remaining apartments in Henle, needless drama between people who may or may not live together and the frightening feeling that all of your friends have found roommates, leaving you all alone.

Yes, for freshmen, the housing selection process for sophomore year is both terrifying and stressful. Dramatic and confusing. Nerve-wracking and miserable. Fortunately for freshmen, 4E is beginning a series of posts, composed by those of us who have survived the process, with advice about how to navigate this stressful difficult process. Today’s post: how to pick your roommate for next year.

Picking roommates for sophomore year is the process that causes the most drama in the housing selection process. Friend groups jostle for who should be placed in which room. Current roommates must choose between living with each other or living with other people. Most of what makes the process of choosing a roommate so difficult is that everyone has a different idea of who they want to live with. And, since freshmen have only known each other for a semester, it’s difficult to know now what your friendship will look like a year from now. After the jump, we include some tips on finding the perfect roommate for next year so that you don’t end up rooming with The Roommate.

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